Star (football badge)

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Juventus first popularised the star in 1958.[1]

In association football, some national and club teams include one or more stars as part of (or beside) the team badge (often referred to as a "crest") appearing on their shirt, to represent important achievements for the team's history. Often a ad hoc decision by a club itself since late 1950s, various national governing bodies at club level and some confederations and the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) at international stage has regulated introduting that recognition after the triumph of a significant number of titles in a specific competition as league tournaments, continental championships and the FIFA World Cup.[1]

Standardised significance[edit]

Club[edit]

The scudetto (Italian for "little shield") was the source of inspiration for the adding of stars.

The first team in association football history to adopt a star was Juventus,[2] who added one golden star with five points in the team's shirt, after Italian Football Federation (FIGC) approval, in 1958 to represent their tenth Italian Football Championship and Serie A title, at the time, the new national record.[1] This was an extension of the existing convention by which the reigning champions are entitled to display the scudetto on their shirts for the following season. The star was later formally adopted by some organisations as a symbol for ten titles, and the ratio of one star for ten titles has become the "most common" arrangement.[3]

Juventus unofficially won their 30th league title in 2011–12, but a dispute with the Italian Football Federation, who stripped Juventus of their 2004–05 title and did not assign to them the 2005–06 title due to their involvement in a 2006 Italian football scandal, left their official total at 28. However, they elected to wear no stars at all the following season.[4] Juventus won their 30th title in 2013–14 and thus earned the right to wear their third star, however, club president Andrea Agnelli stated that the club suspended the use of the stars until another team wins their 20th championship, thus having the right to wear two stars, "to emphasise Juventus' superiority".[5] However, for the 2015–16 season, Juventus reintroduced the stars and added the third star to their jersey as well with new kit manufacturers Adidas.[6]

In Scotland, Rangers displayed five stars above the badge on their shirts in 2003 to symbolise their 50 league titles. Celtic have one star above their badge to represent their triumph in the 1967 European Cup. Aberdeen displayed two stars to commemorate their 1980s wins in the European Cup Winners' Cup and European Super Cup.[7]

Gianluigi Buffon in 2016. Juventus F.C. wear 3 stars above their crest to represent the 30 league championships they have amassed. Also present in the image are the Scudetto and the Coccarda, worn by the current holders of the Serie A and Coppa Italia titles respectively.

Football in Germany has two official star systems operating in parallel. In 2004, the DFL, which governs the Bundesliga (the top two divisions), introduced Verdiente Meistervereine (roughly "distinguished champion clubs"). This has a sliding scale of 1, 2, 3, and 4 stars for 3, 5, 10, and 20 titles.[8] It includes only Bundesliga titles, excluding titles from before the formation of the Bundesliga in 1963, and from the former East German League. Dynamo Berlin (playing in the fourth level) unilaterally began wearing three unapproved stars for its East German titles.[9] In November 2005, the DFB, which governs non-Bundesliga football, allowed former champions playing outside the Bundesliga to display a single star inscribed with the number of titles.[10] In 2007, Dynamo Berlin switched to a single approved star inscribed with the number 10. Greuther Fürth retains three silver stars on its club badge, but not on its shirts.

Major League Soccer's previously informal system, one star per MLS Cup title, was standardised in 2006, with the defending champions wearing the MLS Scudetto, like the Serie A system, for one season before adding a new star. Starting in 2012, the Scudetto was replaced with a single gold star worn by reigning champions above any other silver championship stars. In 2016, this system changed again in recognition of the LA Galaxy's fifth championship title: champion clubs during their title defence will wear a large gold star (featuring the year of the league win) above other smaller stars set in silver; clubs with five championships (presently only the Galaxy) will wear one gold star; and teams with one-to-four MLS Cup wins will wear one silver star for each victory.[11] In Australia, they also use a system based around different coloured stars for different trophy wins: Australian winners of the AFC Champions League will wear a gold star inscribed with the number of wins, while A-League and W-League victory is recognised with a silver star similarly embossed; reigning league or FFA Cup champions will also wear a gold competition emblem in the season following the championship.[12]

In Norway a team will display a star for every 10 titles in Tippeligaen. Rosenborg is the only team with more than 10 titles. Since 2006, all Swedish football clubs that have won ten or more Swedish championships have added a star above their badge. Malmö FF added a second star following its 20th championship title win in 2017. The same system has applied in the Dutch Eredivisie from the 2007–08 season onwards.[13] This innovation was suggested by PSV, after the club won its twentieth title in 2007.[14] Ajax currently have the right to wear three stars since they have won the league more than 30 times. PSV have the right to wear two stars with their 21 league titles, while Feyenoord and HVV Den Haag can add one for their 15 and 10 titles, respectively. HVV won all titles before 1915 and is currently playing in the fourth level of the Dutch league system. In Malta, Floriana, Valletta and Sliema Wanderers boast 2 Golden Stars on their badges having won 25, 20 and 26 titles, respectively, while Hibernians have one star thanks to their 10 titles. No other team in the Maltese League has the golden star on their badge.

Rowdies logo used from 2011-2013
Rowdies logo used since 2013
The Tampa Bay Rowdies added a star in recognition of a title won by a former club with the same name. They have since added another star after the new club won a league championship of its own.

Occasionally, stars are added to badges of successor or phoenix clubs for the achievements of defunct predecessors. An example of this is the Tampa Bay Rowdies. They added a star to represent the Soccer Bowl, the championship of the original NASL, won by the original Tampa Bay Rowdies in 1975. The club has since added a second star, after the new club won the 2012 edition of the resurrected Soccer Bowl in the new NASL.[15] This approach is atypical: neither the Montreal Impact nor the Seattle Sounders FC franchises retained the stars worn by the old clubs when they joined the MLS.[nb 1] In the case of the Impact, the new team paid tribute to the former team's first title through the stripes on their badge.[16]

As well as predecessor clubs, victories in the national leagues of defunct countries have also been represented by stars. FC Dynamo Kyiv have two stars, commemorating championships won in the Soviet and Ukrainian football league systems. The same is true of Belgrade clubs Partizan and Red Star who have won titles in Yugoslavia, Serbia and Montenegro and present-day Serbia, while Spartak Moscow's four stars for every five league titles refer to their 22 Soviet Top League and Russian Football Premier League titles.

The star has given rise to a byword to winning trophies. Examples of this include when Fawaz Al-Hasawi, then owner of Nottingham Forest, was quoted as saying "maybe [Nottingham Forest] will have a third star",[17] and France international Paul Pogba's comments in the days before the 2018 FIFA World Cup Final: "Croatia do not have stars – they want one. They have done very well and they want the victory, like us. But I do not have a star. It’s on the shirt, but I did not win it. We want to go looking for it like all players."[18]

International[edit]

The first international team to add stars was Brazil. Their badge now features five stars.

Brazil had two stars above their badge in 1968. It was used briefly (friendly matches only) and then removed. After winning their third World Cup in 1970, three stars were officially added and Italy did likewise in 1982. Germany added three in 1996, one in each of the German flag's colours. All world champions have since followed suit. Brazil, Italy, and Germany have since added more stars, after they won later tournaments (cf. 1994, 2002, 2006, 2014), while France are the most recent nation to add a star, commemorating their 2018 triumph less than an hour after victory in the Final.[19]

Uruguay display four stars, including their triumphs in the 1924 and 1928 Olympics, which are regarded as FIFA amateur world championships by the governing body. The 1924 FIFA Congress ruled, “on condition that the Olympic Football Tournament takes place in accordance with the Regulations of FIFA, the latter shall recognize this as a world football championship”,[20][21] and the 1924 and 1928 championships are regarded as equivalent to World Cups in the 1984 Official History of FIFA.[20][21]

In the equipment regulations for FIFA competitions, section 16.1 states, "Those Member Associations that have won one or more of the previous editions of the FIFA World Cup or the FIFA Women's World Cup may display on the Playing Equipment used by their first men's or women's representative teams a five-pointed star, or other symbol as instructed by FIFA, per edition of the FIFA World Cup (men's shirt) or FIFA Women's World Cup (women's shirt) won by the Member Association."[22] The form of symbol is now specified, the accompanying illustrative example depicts a gold star.[22]

Ad hoc adoptions[edit]

More recently, club teams have added stars either upon winning a landmark trophy, or in response to a rival team's having added stars. In the Romanian first league, Steaua uses 2 stars above their badge since they won their 20th title. Since then Dinamo added a star for the 18 championships they won. Manchester United sported a star in their UEFA Champions League matches on their special European home kit between 1997 and 1999.[23] To celebrate their second victory that year, they added an extra star to that kit for the 1999–00 season.[23] Liverpool likewise wore four stars in 2001–02, their first campaign in the competition since the Heysel Stadium disaster in 1985.[23] They wore five stars in the competition in 2005–06 after their fifth victory. Instead of stars, UEFA introduced a multiple winner badge in 2000–01 season, currently worn by five teams who have won the Champions League either five times or more in total, or three times in a row.

Using stars to represent trophy wins has spread to other sports: rugby union club Toulon are an example of this.

Occasionally, stars are temporarily added for one season, usually to commemorative kits to celebrate the anniversary of a particular event in the club's history. Burnley sported two stars on their 2006–07 shirt, for the club's 125th anniversary, to celebrate their two league titles in 1921 and 1960.[23] Likewise Bury in 2009–10, also for their 125th anniversary, commemorating their 1900 and 1903 FA Cup triumphs; Bury have since revived the stars, from 2011–12, after a season's absence.[24] Commemorating anniversaries in this way is not confined to English clubs: Peruvian side Universitario celebrated their 90th anniversary by adding 26 stars to their kits worn home[25] and away.[26] This is not a practice limited to clubs, as in 2004, Denmark wore a star on their shirts specially for Euro 2004, to commemorate their victory in the competition in 1992.

In women's football, the emerging ad hoc standard is to wear stars on the sleeve instead of above the badge. Two of the four teams that have won the FIFA Women's World Cup to date — Norway and Germany — use this practice, as did three-time Women's World Cup winners, the USA, until moving the stars to the back collar in 2007. The United States has returned its two stars to above the badge on their new uniforms for the 2011 Women's World Cup,[27] and have added a third and fourth star since their 2015 and 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup championships.[28]

The practice of using stars to signify major titles has spread to other football codes, and to unrelated sports. For example, in 2009, Meath senior Gaelic football team began wearing seven stars on their jerseys, signifying their seven All-Ireland Senior Football Championships.[29] In rugby union, Toulon added a star above its badge after winning the Heineken Cup in 2013, added a second star immediately after winning the same competition in 2014[30] and a third after winning the inaugural European Rugby Champions Cup in 2015; English rugby union side Sale Sharks wear a gold star in tribute to their sole Premiership title.[31] In basketball, the men's team of Indiana University Bloomington added five stars to its shorts, representing its five NCAA championships, for the 2015 NCAA tournament, and made the stars at that location a permanent fixture for the 2015–16 season.[32]

List[edit]

Excluding the temporary stars, the following teams have chosen to add stars to their shirts:

National teams[edit]

Men[edit]

Intercontinental
National Team Title(s)
represented
First
worn
Number
of stars
Notes
 Brazil World Cup 1971 5 Third win was in 1970; fourth and fifth stars added after 1994 and 2002 wins. Briefly wore 2 stars on a tour of Europe in 1968.[33][34]
 Italy World Cup 1982 4 Added after third win; fourth star added after the 2006 win. Incorporated into the badge from 2005 to 2017.[35]
 Germany World Cup 1996 4 Stars first added during Euro 1996 qualification, representing wins in 1954, 1974 and 1990 (as "West Germany"). Worn above the badge. Fourth win was in 2014.
 Uruguay World Cup and Olympics 1930 4 (2+2) Represent 2 Olympic football titles (1924 & 1928)[20][21] and 2 World Cups (1930 & 1950)
 Argentina World Cup 2003 2 Titles won in 1978 and 1986. The stars were added in 2004.[36]
 France World Cup 1998 2 Titles won in 1998 and 2018. The first star that was added above their badge was unveiled at their opening qualifying game for Euro 2000.
 England World Cup 2003 1 Title won in 1966. Star added in 2003 after a campaign on Sky Sports' Soccer AM programme, first worn on the sleeve.
 Spain World Cup 2010 1 Title won in 2010. Spain played in their away kit for the final, but upon winning the World Cup they changed into their home kit, complete with a star above the badge, for the presentation ceremony.
Continental
National Team Title(s)
represented
First
worn
Number
of stars
Notes
 Egypt Africa Cup of Nations 2000 7 Titles won in 1957, 1959, 1986 and 1998. Subsequent stars added after their 2006, 2008 and 2010 triumphs.
 Cameroon Africa Cup of Nations 2008 5 Titles won in 1984, 1988, 2000 and 2002. A fifth star was added after their 2017 victory.
 Ghana Africa Cup of Nations 2008 4 Titles won in 1963, 1965, 1978 and 1982.
 Japan Asian Cup 2011 4 Titles won in 1992, 2000, 2004, and 2011. For commemorative kits only.
 Nigeria Africa Cup of Nations 2013 3 Titles won in 1980, 1994 and 2013.
 Algeria Africa Cup of Nations 2010 2 Title won in 1990. Second star added after 2019 win.
 DR Congo Africa Cup of Nations 2013 2 Titles won in 1968 and 1974.
 Ivory Coast Africa Cup of Nations 2010 2 Title won in 1992. Second star added after 2015 win.
 Peru Copa América 2019 2 Titles won in 1939 and 1975.
 Morocco Africa Cup of Nations 2019 1 Title won in 1976.
 Tunisia Africa Cup of Nations 2004 1 Title won in 2004.
 Zambia Africa Cup of Nations 2012 1 Title won in 2012.
 Qatar Asian Cup 2019 1 Title won in 2019.
 South Africa Africa Cup of Nations 2020 1 Title won in 1996.

Women[edit]

National Team Title(s)
represented
First
worn
Number
of stars
Notes
 United States Women's World Cup 1991 4 Worn on the chest, worn on the back collar between 2007 and 2011 and until early 2007 worn on the sleeve. Second star added following the victory in the 1999 World Cup. Third and fourth stars added following the back-to-back triumphs in the 2015 and 2019 World Cups.
 Germany Women's World Cup 2003 2 Until 2003 the three stars of the men's team had been worn. Second star added for their 2007 victory.
 Norway Women's World Cup 1995 1 Worn on the chest, worn on the sleeve until 2015.
 Japan Women's World Cup 2011 1

Note: Some women's teams, such as Uruguay and Brazil, wear the men's stars on their jersey.

Club teams[edit]

AFC[edit]

Club Team Country Title(s)
represented
Number
of stars
Notes
Western Sydney Wanderers  Australia AFC Champions League 1 Gold star for winning the 2014 AFC Champions League, introduced in 2015.[12]
Melbourne Victory  Australia A-League 1 Silver star for winning the A-League.
Brisbane Roar  Australia A-League 1 Silver star (inscribed with the number 3) for winning the A-League thrice, star added in 2015.[12]
Sydney FC  Australia A-League 1 Silver star (inscribed with the number 5) for winning the A-League five times, star added in 2015, and updated in 2019 and 2020.[37]
Central Coast Mariners  Australia A-League 1 Silver star for winning the A-League
Newcastle Jets  Australia A-League 1 Silver star for winning the A-League
Adelaide United  Australia A-League 1 Silver star for winning the A-League.
Wollongong Wolves  Australia National Soccer League, New South Wales state champions 4 Two gold stars for NSL victories in 2000 and 2001 and two silver stars for state-level titles in 1987 and 2008.[38]
Shandong Luneng  China PR Chinese Jia-A League, Chinese Super League 4 One title per star.
Guangzhou Evergrande  China PR Chinese Super League, AFC Champions League 2 One star each for AFC Champions League and Chinese Super League; stars for the respective number of wins (two for ACL, seven for CSL) on sleeves.
Shenzhen Ruby  China PR Chinese Super League 1 One title per star.
Changchun Yatai  China PR Chinese Super League 1 One title per star.
Beijing Guoan  China PR Chinese Super League 1 One title per star.
Shanghai Shenhua  China PR Chinese Jia-A League 1 One title per star.
Shanghai SIPG  China PR Chinese Super League 1 One title per star.
Mohun Bagan  India National Football League and I-League 4 Three National Football League titles and one I-League title.
Arema Malang  Indonesia Liga 1 2 One league title per star; Arema Malang won Premier Division titles in 2004 and 2010.
Bali United  Indonesia Liga 1 1 One league title per star; Bali won its first Premier Division title in 2019.
Persib Bandung  Indonesia Liga 1 2 One league title per star; Persib had won Premier Division titles in 1995 and 2014.
Persija Jakarta  Indonesia Perserikatan and Liga 1 11 Nine Perserikatan titles and one Premier Division title, in 2001.
Persik Kediri  Indonesia Liga 1 2 One league title per star; Persik won Premier Division titles in 2003 and 2006.
Persipura Jayapura  Indonesia Liga 1 4 One league title per star; Persipura won four Premier Division titles in 2005, 2009, 2011 and 2013.
Semen Padang  Indonesia Liga 1 1 One league title per star; Semen Padang won its first Premier Division title in 2012.
Sriwijaya  Indonesia Liga 1 2 One league title per star. Sriwijaya FC had won the Premir Division in 2008 and 2012 but in 2011–12 season was not organized by the Premier Division or PSSI, causing internal conflict, so the real champions of 2011–12 are Semen Padang.
Persepolis  Iran Iranian Football League 1 For their record ten championship titles won in Iranian Football League.
Esteghlal  Iran Asian Club Championship 2 For their Asian Club Championship triumphs.
PAS Hamedan  Iran Asian Club Championship 1 A star for their Asian Club Championship triumph.
Damash Tehran  Iran Tehran Province League 1 For their Tehran Province League triumph.
Al-Shorta  Iraq Asian Club Championship, Arab Club Champions Cup 2 One star for the 1971 Asian Club Championship, where the club reached the final and refused to play against an Israeli team in protest at the Israeli occupation of Palestine, and one star for the 1981–82 Arab Club Champions Cup victory.[39][40]
Gamba Osaka  Japan AFC Champions League, J1 League, Emperor's Cup, J. League Cup 9 A star for each major title; the star for their sole AFC Champions League title is larger than the others.
Kashima Antlers  Japan J1 League, J. League Cup, Emperor's Cup, AFC Champions League 2 A star for every ten major titles.
Urawa Red Diamonds  Japan J1 League, AFC Champions League 3 A large star for each ACL title, a small star for each J1 League title.
Kawasaki Frontale  Japan J1 League 3 A star for each major title.
Nagoya Grampus  Japan J1 League, Emperor's Cup 3 A star for each major title.
Shonan Bellmare  Japan J. League Cup, Asian Cup Winners' Cup, Emperor's Cup 3 A star for each major title.
Kashiwa Reysol  Japan J1 League, J. League Cup, Emperor's Cup 4 A star for each major title.
Yokohama F. Marinos  Japan J1 League 4 A star for each J1 League title.
Tokyo Verdy  Japan J1 League 2 A star for each J1 League title.
Sanfrecce Hiroshima  Japan J1 League 3 A star for each J1 League title.
Júbilo Iwata  Japan J1 League 3 A star for each J1 League title.
Cerezo Osaka  Japan J. League Cup, Emperor's Cup 2 A star for each major title.
Oita Trinita  Japan J. League Cup 1 A star for each J. League Cup title.
JEF United Chiba  Japan J. League Cup 2 A star for each J. League Cup title.
Kyoto Sanga  Japan Emperor's Cup 1 A star for each Emperor's Cup title.
Vissel Kobe  Japan Emperor's Cup 1 A star for each Emperor's Cup title.
Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors  Korea Republic K League Classic 8 One title per star.
Seongnam Ilhwa Chunma  Korea Republic K League Classic 7 One title per star; six stars introduced in 2003, with seventh star worn since 2007.[41]
Pohang Steelers  Korea Republic K League Classic 5 One title per star.
Busan IPark  Korea Republic K League Classic 4 One title per star: four stars worn since 2010.[41]
Suwon Samsung Bluewings  Korea Republic K League Classic 4 One title per star: three stars introduced initially in 2005, with fourth star added in 2009.[41]
Ulsan Hyundai  Korea Republic K League Classic 2 One title per star; stars added in 1998.[41]
Ulsan Hyundai Mipo Dolphin  Korea Republic Korea National League 3 One title per star.
Goyang KB  Korea Republic Korea National League 3 One title per star.
Gangneung City  Korea Republic Korea National League 1 One title per star.
Suwon City  Korea Republic Korea National League 1 One title per star; began wearing star in 2011.[41]
Incheon Korail  Korea Republic Korea National League 1 One title per star; star worn since 2011.[41]
Gyeongju Citizen  Korea Republic K3 League 2 One title per star.
Seoul United  Korea Republic K3 League 1 One title per star.
Yangju Citizen  Korea Republic K3 League 1 One title per star.
FC Pocheon  Korea Republic K3 League 1 One title per star.
Al Ansar  Lebanon Lebanese Premier League 1 Represents ten titles.
Al Shabiba Mazraa Beirut  Lebanon Lebanese Premier League 1 Represents title won in 1967.
Kelantan FA  Malaysia Malaysian Super League 2 One title per star; represents MSL titles won in 2011 and 2012.
Al-Sadd  Qatar AFC Champions League 2 A star for each AFC Champions League triumph.
Al Hilal  Saudi Arabia AFC Champions League, Asian Cup Winners Cup, Asian Super Cup 7 A star for each AFC Champions League, Asian Cup Winners Cup and Asian Super Cup triumph.
Al-Ain  United Arab Emirates UAE Pro League 1 Represents ten titles; star worn since 2012.
Sharjah FC  United Arab Emirates UAE Pro League 1 Represents five titles.
Al-Ahli (Dubai)  United Arab Emirates UAE Pro League 2 Two stars for their ten championship titles in the UAE League: seven with Al-Ahli Dubai FC and three with Al Shabab Al Arabi Club Dubai.
Pakhtakor  Uzbekistan Uzbekistan League 2 Each star represents five titles.
Bunyodkor  Uzbekistan Uzbekistan League 1 Represents five titles.
Neftchi Fergana  Uzbekistan Uzbekistan League 1 Represents five titles.

CAF[edit]

Club Team Country Title(s)
represented
Number
of stars
Notes
JS Kabylie  Algeria various African titles 7 Two CAF Champions Leagues (1981, 1990),[Af 1] three CAF Cups (2000, 2001, 2002), one African Cup Winners' Cup (1995) and one CAF Super Cup (1982).
ES Sétif  Algeria CAF Champions League 4 Two CAF Champions Leagues (1988, 2014), one CAF Super cup (2015) and one Afro-Asian Cup.[Af 1]
MC Alger  Algeria CAF Champions League 1 Title won in 1976.[Af 1]
Canon Yaoundé  Cameroon CAF Champions League 3 Titles won in 1971, 1978 and 1980.[Af 1]
Union Douala  Cameroon CAF Champions League 2 (1 + 1) One star for CAF Champions League won in 1979,[Af 1] and one star for African Cup Winners' Cup won in 1981.
TP Mazembe  Democratic Republic of the Congo CAF Champions League, Linafoot 5 (4 + 1) Represents ten titles and four CAF Champions Leagues (1967, 1968, 2009, 2010).[Af 1]
AS Vita Club  Democratic Republic of the Congo CAF Champions League 1 Title won in 1973.[Af 1]
Al Ahly  Egypt Egyptian League, CAF Champions League 4 + 9 Four stars above club's badge, represents forty Egyptian Premier League titles; nine stars under club's badge, represents nine CAF Champions League titles (1982, 1987, 2001, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2012, 2013, 2020).
Zamalek  Egypt Egyptian League 1 Each star represents ten titles.
Hafia FC  Guinea CAF Champions League 3 Titles won in 1972, 1975 and 1977.[Af 1]
ASEC Mimosas  Ivory Coast CAF Champions League 1 Title won in 1998.
Stade d'Abidjan  Ivory Coast CAF Champions League 1 Title won in 1966.[Af 1]
Gor Mahia F.C.  Kenya African Cup Winners' Cup 1 Title won in 1987.
Al-Ittihad  Libya Libyan Premier League 1 Awarded star after winning tenth Libyan Premier League title in 2002–03.
Raja Casablanca  Morocco CAF Champions League, Botola 4 (1 + 3) Represents ten titles, and three CAF Champions Leagues (1989, 1997, 1999).[Af 1]
FAR Rabat  Morocco Botola 1 Represents ten titles.
Wydad Casablanca  Morocco Botola, CAF Champions League 4 Represents twenty titles, and two CAF Champions Leagues (1992, 2017).
Enyimba  Nigeria CAF Champions League 2 Titles won in 2003 and 2004.
CARA Brazzaville  Republic of the Congo CAF Champions League 1 Title won in 1974.[Af 1]
Mamelodi Sundowns  South Africa CAF Champions League 1 Title won in 2016.[42][Af 1]
Orlando Pirates  South Africa CAF Champions League 1 Title won in 1995.[43][Af 1]
Espérance de Tunis  Tunisia Tunisian Ligue 2 + 4 Represents twenty titles, and four CAF Champions Leagues (1994, 2011, 2018, 2019).
Club Africain  Tunisia Tunisian Ligue 1 + 1 Represents ten titles.
ES Sahel  Tunisia CAF Champions League 1 + 1 Title won in 2007.[Af 1]
Notes
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n The CAF Champions League was known as the African Cup of Champions Clubs prior to 1997.

CONCACAF[edit]

Club Team Country Title(s)
represented
Number
of stars
Notes
Montreal Impact  Canada USL First Division, A-League, American Professional Soccer League 3 Each star represents a league championship, won in 1994, 2004 and 2009; two stars were worn after their second league title, and a third star was added after their third title; the stars were removed when they joined Major League Soccer for the 2012 season; the four stars on the 2012 Impact logo do not represent championships, but instead the four founding communities of Montreal represented on the city's coat of arms.[16]
Toronto FC  Canada MLS Cup 1 Title won in 2017
Vancouver Whitecaps  Canada USL First Division, North American Soccer League 3 Two stars were worn for their two championships in the USL First Division (2006, 2008) and one for the Vancouver Whitecaps (NASL) win in the Soccer Bowl of 1979; the stars were removed when they joined Major League Soccer for the 2011 season.
Herediano  Costa Rica Costa Rican league 27 One star per national league title.
Saprissa  Costa Rica Costa Rican league 2 Costa Rica's most recent champions wear one star for every consecutive national league championship.
Jong Colombia  Curaçao CONCACAF Champions' Cup (Caribbean Zone) and Sekshon Pagá. 3 (2+1) Two stars for CONCACAF Champions League (Caribbean Zone) titles (1967 and 1979) and one star for at least ten league titles.
Atlético Pantoja  Dominican Republic Liga Mayor 3 Star for each national title won.
Firpo  El Salvador La Primera 9 Star for each national title won.
Racing CH  Haiti CONCACAF Champions League 1 Title won in 1963
Guadalajara  Mexico Mexican First Division 12 One star per title.
Pachuca  Mexico Mexican First Division, CONCACAF Champions League, Copa Sudamericana 12 (6+6) One star per league title; six gold stars for continental trophies: five stars for CONCACAF Champions League titles, and one star for its Copa Sudamericana title.
Toluca  Mexico Mexican First Division 10 One star per title.
Cruz Azul  Mexico Mexican First Division 8 One star per league title, incorporated into the crest.
León  Mexico Mexican First Division 8 One star per title.
Monterrey  Mexico Mexican First Division + CONCACAF Champions League 9 (5+4) Five silver stars above for league titles. Four gold stars below for CONCACAF Champions League titles.
UANL  Mexico Mexican First Division 7 One star per league title.
Santos Laguna  Mexico Mexican First Division 6 One star per title.
Atlante  Mexico Mexican First Division 3 One star per title.
Necaxa  Mexico Mexican First Division 3 One star per title.
Puebla  Mexico Mexican First Division and Mexican Cup 7 (2+5) Two gold stars incorporated into crest for league titles. Five blue stars outside for cup titles.
Veracruz  Mexico Mexican First Division 2 Titles won in 1946 and 1950.
Atlas  Mexico Mexican First Division 1 Title won in 1951.
Morelia  Mexico Mexican First Division 1 Title won in Invierno 2000.
Tecos  Mexico Mexican First Division 1 Title won in 1994.
Tijuana  Mexico Mexican First Division 1 Title won in 2012.
Murciélagos  Mexico Mexican Third Division 1 Title won in 2012.
Celaya  Mexico Mexican Division Promotion 2 One star per division promotion.
Real Estelí  Nicaragua Nicaraguan Primera División 2 First two national championships won by the club (in 1991 and 1999).
Tauro F.C.  Panama Liga Panameña de Fútbol 1 Represents ten titles.
Puerto Rico Islanders  Puerto Rico CFU Club Championship 2 One title per star.
S.V. Transvaal  Suriname CONCACAF Champions League and SVB Topklasse. 3 (2+1) Two stars for CONCACAF Champions League titles and one star for at least ten league titles.
Defence Force F.C.  Trinidad and Tobago CONCACAF Champions League, CFU Club Championship and TT Pro League. 4 (2+1+1) Two stars for CONCACAF Champions League titles, one star for CFU Club Championship and one star for at least ten league titles.
LA Galaxy  United States MLS Cup 1 One single gold star to symbolize their five MLS Cup titles.
D.C. United  United States MLS Cup 4 Titles won in 1996, 1997, 1999 and 2004.
Seattle Sounders FC  United States MLS Cup 2 Titles won in 2016 and 2019.
Houston Dynamo FC  United States MLS Cup 2 Titles won in 2006 and 2007.
San Jose Earthquakes  United States MLS Cup 2 Titles won in 2001 and 2003;[nb 2]
Sporting Kansas City  United States MLS Cup 2 Titles won in 2000 (as Kansas City Wizards) and 2013 (as Sporting Kansas City).
Chicago Fire  United States MLS Cup 1 Title won in 1998.
Columbus Crew SC  United States MLS Cup 2 Titles won in 2008 and 2020.
Real Salt Lake  United States MLS Cup 1 Title won in 2009.
Colorado Rapids  United States MLS Cup 1 Title won in 2010.
Portland Timbers  United States MLS Cup 1 Title won in 2015, star featured on 2016 change jersey.[44]
Atlanta United FC  United States MLS Cup 1 Title won in 2018.
Louisville City FC  United States USL Cup 2 Representing the back-to-back USL Cup Championships won in 2017 and 2018.
Seattle Sounders  United States A-League, USL First Division 4 Two of each title achieved: A-League titles in 1995 and 1996, USL-1 champions in 2005 and 2007.
Tampa Bay Rowdies  United States North American Soccer League championships 2 The team, which began play in 2010 as FC Tampa Bay in the D2 Pro League and now plays in the current North American Soccer League (NASL), added the first star to represent the Soccer Bowl, the championship of the original NASL, won by the original Tampa Bay Rowdies in 1975; a second star was added after the new club won Soccer Bowl 2012.[15]
Minnesota United FC  United States North American Soccer League championship 1 Title won in 2011.[45]
Rochester Rhinos  United States A-League, U.S. Open Cup 4 Four titles won in four seasons: their first championship was the A-League in 1998; victory in the 1999 U.S. Open Cup, before the Rhinos picked up successive A-League titles in 2000 and 2001; four stars were added in 2013.[46]
San Antonio Scorpions FC  United States North American Soccer League championship 1 Title won in 2014,[47] star added shortly afterwards.[48]
Cleveland City Stars  United States USL Second Division championship 1 Cleveland won the 2008 USL Second Division championship and moved into the USL First Division for 2009, along with the Austin Aztex, to replace the departed Seattle Sounders and Atlanta Silverbacks. The team folded after the 2009 season.
Tulsa Roughnecks FC  United States North American Soccer League championship 1 The team, which began play in 2015 in the rebranded United Soccer League, added a star to the back of their inaugural kit to represent the original Tulsa Roughnecks' sole Soccer Bowl success, when victory in Soccer Bowl '83 resulted in them being crowned NASL champions.[49]
Akron Zips  United States NCAA Division I 1 Represents 2010 NCAA Division I Men's Soccer Championship.
Northern Kentucky Norse  United States NCAA Division II 1 Represents club's 2010 NCAA Division II national championship. The team retained its star even after moving to Division I in 2012.
AFC Cleveland  United States National Premier Soccer League championship 1 Title won in 2016.

CONMEBOL[edit]

Club Team Country Title(s)
represented
Number
of stars
Notes
Vélez Sársfield  Argentina Argentine League, Copa Libertadores, and Intercontinental Cup 11 (1+10) Gold star for 1994 Intercontinental Cup over ten blue stars for six Argentine and four international titles.[50]
Estudiantes  Argentina Argentine League, Copa Libertadores, and Intercontinental Cup 11 Five Argentine league titles; four Copa Libertadores; 1968 Intercontinental and 1969 Interamerican Cups;[51] an earlier badge had just four stars, for the Libertadores and Intercontinental titles; [51] tenth star added after 2009 Copa Libertadores victory.
Rosario Central  Argentina Argentine league and CONMEBOL Cup 6 (4+1+1) The middle star, for the CONMEBOL Cup, is larger. The previous badge had five blue stars and one larger yellow star; the extra small star was for the unofficial "1974 Argentinian Championship",[52] a qualification playoff for the 1974 Copa Libertadores.[53]
Newell's Old Boys  Argentina Argentine league 7 One star per title, including one each for the 1990 Apertura and the 1990/91 Apertura/Clausura playoff.[54]
Argentinos Juniors  Argentina Argentine League, Copa Libertadores, and Interamerican Cup 5 Three Argentine League; 1985 Libertadores and 1986 Interamerican Cup
Lanús  Argentina Argentine League, National Cup and two international titles. 5 Two Argentine League (2007 and 2016); 2016 Copa Bicentenario, 2013 Copa Sudamericana and 1996 Copa CONMEBOL.
Boca Juniors  Argentina Various Titles 68 The club has a policy of adding a star to their badge since 1970 for each title won ever (except during 2007–2009, when a design with only three stars was used for each Intercontinental Cup won); however, the version of the club badge on the shirts provided by kit manufacturer Nike remains on 52 stars as of 2019.
Quilmes AC  Argentina Argentine league 2 For amateur titles of 1912 and 1978 Metropolitano
Ferro Carril Oeste  Argentina Argentine league 2 For 1982 Nacional and 1984 Nacional
Banfield  Argentina Argentine league and Copa de Honor 2 For 2009 Torneo Apertura and 1920 amateur Copa de Honor.
Racing  Argentina Intercontinental Cup 1 Trophy won in 1967; star added for the 40th anniversary.
Chacarita Juniors  Argentina Argentine league 1 For 1969 Metropolitano
Joinville  Brazil Campeonato Catarinense 12 For each title won[55]
Americano  Brazil Campeonato da Cidade de Campos 9 For nine consecutive titles from 1967–1975[55]
Vasco da Gama  Brazil Various Brazilian and South American 8 For South American Club Championship 1948; Copa Libertadores 1998; Copa Mercosur 2000; 1974, 1989, 1997 and 2000 Brazilian Championships; unbeaten Campeão de Terra e Mar season in 1945[55][56]
Palmeiras  Brazil Campeonato Paulista, Brazilian Championship, Copa Rio 9 (1+8) Eight titles won under the name "Palestra Itália", between 1920 and 1940; others say it commemorates the eighth month (August) of 1914, when the club was founded;[55] previously wore four silver stars, one for each Brazilian championship conquered (1972, 1973, 1993, 1994); stars are placed inside the badge, rather than the usual placement above; a red star above the badge was added in 2017 for their 1951 Copa Rio win.
Santa Cruz  Brazil Pernambucan Championship 8 (3+5) Club badge has five yellow stars for the five consecutive championships (1969–1973) and three stars for the three "super-championships" (black for 1957, white for 1976, red for 1983).[55]
São Raimundo (AM)  Brazil Copa Norte, Campeonato Amazonense 7 (3 + 4) Three red stars for three consecutive Norte titles from 1999–2001; four silver stars for Amazonas titles[55]
Internacional (Porto Alegre)  Brazil FIFA Club World Cup, Copa Libertadores, Brazilian Championship, Copa do Brasil 6 (1+5) Silver star for 2006 World title, five gold stars for others, with the Libertadores star larger than the other four (three Championships, one Copa).[55][57]
Goiás  Brazil Brazilian Série B and Goiás State Championship 2 Two silver stars, for the 1999 and 2012 Série B championships.
Náutico  Brazil Campeonato Pernambucano 6 For six consecutive titles won from won from 1963–1968[55]
Corinthians  Brazil FIFA Club World Cup, Brazilian Championship 5 (1+4) Larger star for the 2000 FIFA Club World Championship, above the other four stars for four Campeonato Brasileiro titles; the stars were removed for the 2011 season onwards.[55]
América do Natal  Brazil Copa Nordeste, Campeonato Potiguar 5 (1 + 4) One silver star for 1998 Nordeste; four yellow stars for four consecutive Potiguar from 1979–1982[55]
Fortaleza  Brazil Campeonato Cearense and Copa Norte-Nordeste 6 (4+2) Four blue stars for four consecutive Cearense Championships from 2007–2010; two yellow stars for wins of North/Northeast Cup in 1946 and 1970.[58]
Vila Nova  Brazil Campeonato Brasileiro Série C, Campeonato Goiano 5 (1 + 4) One yellow star for 1996 Brasileiro title; four red stars for four consecutive Goiano titles from 1977–1980.[55]
Goiânia  Brazil Campeonato Goiano 5 Five consecutive titles from 1950–1954.[55]
Ceará  Brazil Campeonato Cearense 5 Five consecutive titles from 1915–1919.[55]
ABC  Brazil Campeonato Potiguar 4 Sweep of all four categories in 1954: professional, amateur, junior, and youth leagues.[55]
Colo-Colo (Ilhéus)  Brazil Campeonato de Ilhéus 4 Four consecutive titles from 1960–1963.[55]
São Paulo  Brazil Intercontinental Cup, FIFA Club World Cup 3 (red stars; also 2 gold stars) Three red stars represent two Intercontinental Cups (1992 and 1993) and one FIFA Club World Championship (2005); two gold stars commemorate Adhemar da Silva's triple jump world records at the 1952 Olympics and the 1955 Pan American Games.[59]
Grêmio  Brazil Intercontinental Cup, Libertadores Cup, Brazilian Championship, Copa do Brasil 3 (1+1+1) The gold star on the badge was added in 1970 to honour Everaldo of the 1970 World Cup team, the first Grêmio player to be world champion.[60] It also represents the 1983 Intercontinental title. The silver star represents Continental titles won (three Libertadores and two Recopa); the bronze star represents Brazilian titles (two Championships, one Serie B and five Copas).[55]
Criciuma EC  Brazil Copa do Brasil; Série B; Série C[55] 3[nb 3] Copa won in 1991, Série B won in 2002 and Série C won in 2006.
Fluminense  Brazil Brazilian Championships 3 Titles won in 1970, 1984 and 2010.[55]
Caxias (Santa Catarina)  Brazil Campeonato Catarinense 3 Titles won in 1929, 1954 and 1955.[55]
Galícia  Brazil Campeonato Baiano 3 Three consecutive titles won from 1941–1943.[55]
União Barbarense  Brazil Campeonato Brasileiro Série C, 2 others 3 Série C title won in 2004.[55]
Santos FC  Brazil Intercontinental Cup[55] 2 Titles won in 1962 and 1963.
EC Bahia  Brazil Taça Brasil and Brazilian Championship 2 Taça won in 1959, Championship won 1988.[55]
Atlético Paranaense  Brazil Brazilian Championship and Série B 2 (1 + 1) Gold star for 2001 title, silver star for 1995 Série B title.[55]
Sport Club do Recife  Brazil Brazilian Championship, Série B and Brazilian Cup 3 (1+1+1) Gold star for Championship of 1987, silver star for 1990 Série B[55] and another gold star for 2008 Brazilian Cup.
EC Juventude  Brazil Copa do Brasil and Brazilian Série B 2 (1+1) Gold star for the 1999 Copa, silver star for 1994 Série B.[55][61]
Paraná Clube  Brazil Brazilian Série B 2 For official Série B of 1992 and Yellow Module of Copa João Havelange in 2000.[55]
Paysandu SC  Brazil 2 Titles won in 1991 and 2001.
Brasiliense  Brazil Brazilian Série B and Série C 2 (1+1) Bronze star for C title won in 2002, silver star for B title won in 2004.[55]
América Mineiro  Brazil Campeonato Brasileiro Série B, Campeonato Mineiro 2 (1 + 1) Gold star for 1997 Serie B title, red star for ten consecutive Mineiro titles from 1916–1925.[55]
CRAC  Brazil Campeonato Goiano[55] 2 Titles won in 1967 and 2004.
Grêmio Barueri  Brazil Campeonato Paulista 2 2005 Série A3 title and 2006 Série A2 title.[55]
Flamengo  Brazil Intercontinental Cup[55] 1 Title won in 1981; stars for lesser titles were removed from badge in 2004.
Atlético Mineiro  Brazil Brazilian Championship[55] 1 Represents title won in 1971.; previously wore three stars (two red and one gold), the two red stars for the 1992 and 1997 Copa CONMEBOL titles.
Chapecoense  Brazil Copa Sudamerica 1 Represents title awarded in 2016, another star incorporated into the badge to commemorate the victims of LaMia Flight 2933;[62] previously wore four stars representing 1977, 1996, 2007 and 2011 Campeonato Catarinense titles.
Coritiba  Brazil Brazilian Championship[63] 1 Represents title won in 1985.
Guarani FC  Brazil Brazilian Championship[55] 2 Represents title won in 1978 and Série B of 1981.
Paulista  Brazil Copa do Brasil[55] 1 Title won in 2005.
Santo André  Brazil Copa do Brasil[55] 1 Title won in 2004.
Gama  Brazil Campeonato Brasileiro Série B[55] 1 Title won in 1998.
Londrina  Brazil Campeonato Brasileiro Série B[55] 1 Title won in 1980.
Avaí  Brazil Campeonato Brasileiro Série C[55] 1 Title won in 1998.
Atlético Goianiense  Brazil Campeonato Brasileiro Série C[55] 1 Title won in 1990.
Rio Branco  Brazil Copa Norte[55] 1 Title won in 1997.
Anápolis  Brazil Campeonato Goiano[55] 1 Title won in 1965.
Bragantino  Brazil Campeonato Paulista[55] 1 Title won in 1990.
Brusque  Brazil Campeonato Catarinense[55] 1 Title won in 1992.
Goiatuba  Brazil Goiás State Championship[55] 1 Title won in 1992.
Ipatinga  Brazil Campeonato Mineiro[55] 1 Title won in 2005.[55]
São Caetano  Brazil Campeonato Paulista[55] 1 Title won in 2004.
Colo-Colo  Chile Copa Libertadores 4(1+3) Represents trophy won in 1991 and other three stars addered after winning 30th national championship; each star represents ten titles.
Club Universidad de Chile  Chile Copa Sudamericana 1 Trophy won in 2011.
O'Higgins de Rancagua  Chile Chilean Primera Division 1 Title won in 2013 Apertura.
Cobresal  Chile Chilean Primera Division 1 Title won in 2014 Clausura.
Santiago Wanderers  Chile Chilean Primera Division 3 One star per title.
Everton de Viña del Mar  Chile Chilean Primera Division 4 One star per title.
Huachipato  Chile Chilean Primera Division 2 One star per title.
Santiago Morning  Chile Chilean Primera Division 3 Title won in 1940.
Cobreloa  Chile Chilean Primera Division 8 One star per title.
América de Cali  Colombia Colombian league 13 One star per title.
Atlético Junior  Colombia Colombian league 7 One star per title.
Deportivo Cali  Colombia Colombian league 9 One star per title.
Once Caldas  Colombia Colombian league and Copa Libertadores 5 (4+1) Gold star over badge for Libertadores; four stars within badge for one league win each.[64]
Barcelona SC  Ecuador Ecuadorian Serie A 15 Wore black and later red stars under badge for each Serie A title on shirt starting in 1982 until 2015; starting in 2016 stars no longer worn below badge; wore two black stars above badge in 2007 for two Copa Libertadores runners-up performances in 1991 and 1998.
CD El Nacional  Ecuador Ecuadorian Serie A 20 (13+7) Thirteen gold stars above badge in two rows; the top row consists of three stars grouped together on both left and right with two together in the middle for eight total, the sets on the left and right represent the three consecutive Serie A titles won from 1976–1978 and 1982–1984, the set of two in middle represent the two consecutive Serie A titles won in 2005 (Clausura) and 2006, the second row consists of five additional gold stars for single league titles won, and below the badge is seven silver stars for seven Serie A second place finishes.
CD Cuenca  Ecuador Ecuadorian Serie A 1 Gold star above badge for 2004 Serie A title.
CD Espoli  Ecuador Ecuadorian Serie A 1 White star below badge for 1995 Serie A second place finish.
CD Everest  Ecuador Ecuadorian Serie A 1 Gold star below badge for 1962 Serie A title.
CD Olmedo  Ecuador Ecuadorian Serie A 2 (1+1) White star above badge for 2000 Serie A title; white star below badge for 2004 Serie A second place finish.
CD Técnico Universitario  Ecuador Ecuadorian Serie A and Ecuadorian Serie B 3 (2+1) Wore three black or red stars above badge from 2000 until 2010 for the two Serie A second place finishes in 1978 and 1980, and one for the Serie B titles won.
CS Emelec  Ecuador Ecuadorian Serie A 11 Wore stars under badge for each Serie A title on shirt starting in 1997 until 2015; starting in 2016 stars no longer worn below badge.
CS Patria  Ecuador Ecuadorian Serie A, Campeonato de Guayaquil, and Segunda Categoría del Guayas 4 Four green stars below badge for 1961 Serie A second place finish, two Campeonato de Guayaquil titles in 1958 and 1959, and the 1968 Segunda Categoría del Guayas title.
Delfín SC  Ecuador Ecuadorian Serie A 1 Gold star above badge for 2019 Serie A title.
Independiente del Valle  Ecuador Copa Sudamericana 1 Gold star above badge for 2019 Copa Sudamericana title.
LDU Portoviejo  Ecuador Segunda Categoría de Manabí 1 From 1985–1987 wore a white star above badge for the 1969 Manabi provincial title.
LDU Quito  Ecuador For Copa Libertadores, Copa Sudamericana and Recopa Sudamericana 4 One star for each international title won: 2008 Copa Libertadores, 2009 Copa Sudamericana, 2009 and 2010 Recopa Sudamericana; previously wore red or blue stars above badge for each Serie A title from 1981 until 2003.
SD Aucas  Ecuador Campeonato Amateur del Futbol de Pichincha and Campeonato Professional Interandino 8 (6+2) From 1998 to 2010 wore eight red or black stars above badge: six for provincial amateur titles from 1945–1951, and two inter-provincial professional titles in 1959 and 1962.
SD Quito  Ecuador Ecuadorian Serie A 5 Gold stars above badge for each Serie A title.
Olimpia Asunción  Paraguay Intercontinental Cup and Copa Libertadores 4 One golden star for 1979 Intercontinental Cup, three silver stars for the 1979, 1990 and 2002 Copa Libertadores.
Cienciano  Peru Copa Sudamericana and Recopa Sudamericana 2 Titles won in 2003 and 2004.
FBC Melgar  Peru Peruvian Primera División 2 Peruvian championship title in 1981; second star added after their 2015 championship title.
Juan Aurich  Peru Peruvian Primera División 1 Peruvian championship title won in 2011.
CD San Martín  Peru Peruvian Primera División 3 Peruvian championship titles won in 2007, 2008 and 2010.
Sporting Cristal  Peru Peruvian Primera División 3 Three consecutive titles won from 1994–1996.
Sport Boys  Peru Peruvian Primera División 6 Stars under the badge (one per title).
Comerciantes Unidos  Peru Copa Perú 3 The three stars represent the three times that Comerciantes reached the National Stage of the Copa Perú.[65]
Sport Rosario  Peru Copa Perú 1 Copa Perú championship title won in 2016.
Caracas  Venezuela Primera División Venezolana 10 One title per star.
Deportivo Tachira  Venezuela Primera División Venezolana 6 One title per star.
Deportivo Petare  Venezuela Primera División Venezolana 5 One title per star, titles won as Deportivo Italchacao.
Portuguesa FC  Venezuela Primera División Venezolana 5 One title per star.
Estudiantes de Mérida  Venezuela Primera División Venezolana 2 One title per star.
Minervén  Venezuela Primera División Venezolana 1 One title per star.
Unión Atlético Maracaibo  Venezuela Primera División Venezolana 1 One title per star.
Deportivo Anzoátegui  Venezuela Segunda División Venezolana 1 One title per star.

UEFA[edit]

Club Team Country Title(s)
represented
Number
of stars
Notes
KF Tirana  Albania Albanian Superliga 2 Each star represents ten titles.
Dinamo Tirana  Albania Albanian Superliga 1 Represents ten titles.
Partizani Tirana  Albania Albanian Superliga 1 Represents ten titles.
Rapid Wien  Austria Austrian Bundesliga 3 Each star represents ten titles.
Austria Wien  Austria Austrian Bundesliga 2 Each star represents ten titles.
FC Wacker Innsbruck  Austria Austrian Bundesliga 1 Represents ten titles

(five titles as FC Wacker Innsbruck, two titles as FC Swarovski Tirol, three titles as FC Tirol Innsbruck)

Red Bull Salzburg  Austria Austrian Bundesliga 1 Each star represents ten titles.
Kapaz PFC  Azerbaijan Azerbaijan Premier League 3 One golden star for each league championship.
FC Baku  Azerbaijan Azerbaijan Premier League 2 One golden star for each league championship.
Inter Baku  Azerbaijan Azerbaijan Premier League 2 One golden star per each league championship.
Neftchi Baku  Azerbaijan Azerbaijan Premier League 1 Represents five league championships.
Qarabağ  Azerbaijan Azerbaijan Premier League 1 Represents five league championships.
BATE Borisov  Belarus Belarusian Premier League 3 Each star represents five titles.
Dinamo Minsk  Belarus Belarusian Premier League 1 Represents five titles.
Anderlecht  Belgium Belgian First Division 3 Each golden star represents ten titles.
Club Brugge  Belgium Belgian Pro League 1 Represents ten titles.
Standard Liège  Belgium Belgian Pro League 1 Represents ten titles.
Saint-Gilloise  Belgium Belgian Pro League 1 Represents ten titles. Club currently plays in Belgian Third Division B.
CSKA Sofia  Bulgaria Bulgarian A Group 3 Added three stars after their 30th league title in 2005.
Dinamo Zagreb  Croatia 1. HNL 3 Each star represents ten titles; 30th title won in 2019.
Sparta Prague  Czech Republic Gambrinus Liga 3 Each star represents ten titles.
Slavia Prague  Czech Republic Gambrinus Liga 2 Each star represents ten titles; 20th title won in 2020.
Dukla Prague  Czech Republic Gambrinus Liga 1 Represents ten titles.
APOEL  Cyprus Cypriot First Division 2 Each star represents ten titles.
Omonia  Cyprus Cypriot First Division 2 Each star represents ten titles.
Anorthosis Famagusta  Cyprus Cypriot First Division 1 Represents ten titles.
KB  Denmark Danish Premier League 3 Each star represents five titles.
Copenhagen  Denmark Danish Premier League 2 Each star represents five titles.
Brøndby  Denmark Danish Premier League 2 Each star represents five titles.
AB  Denmark Danish Premier League 1 Each star represents five titles.
B93  Denmark Danish Premier League 1 Each star represents five titles.
B1903  Denmark Danish Premier League 1 Each star represents five titles.
BK Frem  Denmark Danish Premier League 1 Each star represents five titles.
AGF  Denmark Danish Premier League 1 Each star represents five titles.
Esbjerg fB  Denmark Danish Premier League 1 Each star represents five titles.
Vejle BK  Denmark Danish Premier League 1 Each star represents five titles.
Aston Villa  England European Cup 1 Title won in 1982.[43] Star incorporated into the crest.
Bury  England FA Cup 2 Titles won in 1900 and 1903;[43] stars added initially for the 2009–10 season only, reintroduced from 2011 onwards.[24]
Huddersfield Town  England English First Division 3 First team to win English First Division three times in a row, between 1924 and 1926.[43]
Ipswich Town  England English First Division, FA Cup, UEFA Cup 3 Trophies won respectively in 1962, 1978 and 1981.[43] Stars added in 2007.[66]
Nottingham Forest  England European Cup 2 Two silver stars worn above the club crest to commemorate back to back European Cup victories, in 1979 and 1980.[43]
Notts County  England FA Cup 1 One gold star was added in 2013 to represent 120 years since Notts' victory in the 1893–94 FA Cup.[67] County have worn this star each season since then.[68]
Flora Tallinn  Estonia Meistriliiga 2 Each star represents five titles.
Levadia Tallinn  Estonia Meistriliiga 1 Each star represents five titles.
HB  Faroe Islands Faroe Islands Premier League 2 Each star represents ten titles.
 Faroe Islands Faroe Islands Premier League 1 Each star represents ten titles.
B36  Faroe Islands Faroe Islands Premier League 1 Each star represents ten titles.
Helsingin Jalkapalloklubi  Finland Veikkausliiga 5 Each star represents ten titles; three stars for the men’s championships and two stars for the women’s championships.
Nantes  France French league 8 One title per star, incorporated into the crest. Removed in 2019 due to a rebrand.
Marseille  France UEFA Champions League 1 Title won in 1993.
Saint-Étienne  France French league 1 Represents ten titles; last won a title in 1981.
Bayern Munich  Germany German Bundesliga 4 Represents twenty Bundesliga titles; the 1932 German championship win is not counted.[3] Fourth star added after 2008 title[69]
Borussia Mönchengladbach  Germany German Bundesliga 2 Represents five titles.[3]
Borussia Dortmund  Germany German Bundesliga 2 Represents five titles.[3] Second star added in 2012,[70] previously wore only one.[8]
Werder Bremen  Germany German Bundesliga 1 Represents three titles.[3]
Hamburger SV  Germany German Bundesliga 1 Represents three titles.[3]
VfB Stuttgart  Germany German Bundesliga 1 Represents three titles; added after third win.[8]
Olympiacos  Greece Superleague Greece 4 Each star represents ten titles.
Ferencváros  Hungary Hungarian Championship 3 Each star represents ten titles.[71]
MTK  Hungary Hungarian Championship 2 Each star represents ten titles.
Újpest  Hungary Hungarian Championship 2 Each star represents ten titles.
Budapest Honvéd  Hungary Hungarian Championship 1 Each star represents ten titles.
Valur  Iceland Icelandic league 4 Each star represents five titles.
Fram Reykjavík  Iceland Icelandic league 3 Each star represents five titles.
Knattspyrnufélag Reykjavíkur  Iceland Icelandic league 5 Each star represents five titles.
Knattspyrnufélagið Víkingur  Iceland Icelandic league 1 Each star represents five titles.
Íþróttabandalag Akraness  Iceland Icelandic league 3 Each star represents five titles.
Fimleikafélag Hafnarfjarðar  Iceland Icelandic league 1 Each star represents five titles.
Wexford Youths  Ireland FAI Youth Inter-League Cup 2 Titles won by Wexford Football League sides coached by Mick Wallace, founder of Wexford Youths; the junior league is a nursery for the senior club.[72] A third star is due for the 2007–08 victory.[73][74]
Bohemians  Ireland League of Ireland 1 Represents ten titles.
Dundalk  Ireland League of Ireland 1 Represents ten titles.
Shamrock Rovers  Ireland League of Ireland 1 Represents ten titles; tenth title was won in 1964, but star wasn't added until fifteenth title had already been won.
Shelbourne  Ireland League of Ireland 1 Represents ten titles; tenth title was won in 2002, but star wasn't added until eleventh title had already been won
Limerick  Ireland League of Ireland 2 One title per star.
Beitar Jerusalem  Israel Israeli championships 1 Each star represents five titles.
Hapoel Tel Aviv  Israel Israeli championships 2 Each star represents five titles; five titles were won before the state of Israel was formed
Ironi Kiryat Shmona  Israel Israeli championships 1 One title per star.
Maccabi Haifa  Israel Israeli championships 2 Each star represents five titles.
Maccabi Netanya  Israel Israeli championships 5 One title per star.
Maccabi Tel Aviv  Israel Israeli championships 4 Each star represents five titles; five titles were won before the state of Israel was formed.
Juventus  Italy Italian Serie A 3 Each represents ten Italian Football Championship and Serie A titles. The first, added in 1958 by a Lega Calcio sentence, represents the first case in association football history which a star is used in the kits as a sporting and honorific symbol.[1] Second star added in 1982. Added a third star following their supposed 30th league title in 2011–12 but removed them all following a dispute with the Italian Football Federation, who stripped Juventus of their 2004–05 title and did not assign to them the 2005–06 title due to the 2006 Italian football scandal, leaving the official total at 28. Juventus have since won their 30th title in the 2013–14 season and thus earned the right to wear the third star, the club removed all stars until another club earns the right to wear two stars to emphasise their superiority.[5] However, the three stars have been reinstated from 2015–16.[6]
Internazionale  Italy Italian Serie A 1 Represents ten titles. Added in 1966.
Milan  Italy Italian Serie A 1 Represents ten titles. Added in 1979.
Ventspils  Latvia Latvian Higher League 1 Each star represents five titles.
Jeunesse Esch  Luxembourg National Division 2 Each represents ten titles.
F91 Dudelange  Luxembourg National Division 1 Represents ten titles.
Sliema Wanderers  Malta Maltese Premier League 2 Each star represents ten titles.
Floriana  Malta Maltese Premier League 2 Each star represents ten titles.
Valletta  Malta Maltese Premier League 2 Each star represents ten titles.
Hibernians  Malta Maltese Premier League 1 Represents ten titles.
Sheriff Tiraspol  Moldova Moldovan League 1 Represents ten titles.
Ajax  Netherlands Eredivisie and Dutch Championship (pre-1956) 3 Each star represents ten titles.
PSV Eindhoven  Netherlands Eredivisie and Dutch Championship (pre-1956) 2 Each star represents ten titles.
Feyenoord  Netherlands Eredivisie and Dutch Championship (pre-1956) 1 Represents ten titles.
HVV Den Haag  Netherlands Dutch Championship (pre-1956) 1 Represents ten titles.[75] Star incorporated into the crest.
Vardar  North Macedonia Macedonian First Football League 2 Each star represents five titles.
Linfield  Northern Ireland Northern Irish league 5 Each star represents ten titles.
Rosenborg  Norway Norwegian league 2 Each star represents ten titles.
Górnik Zabrze  Poland Polish League 1 Gold star represents ten or more titles.
Ruch Chorzów  Poland Polish League 1 Gold star represents ten or more titles.
Wisla Kraków  Poland Polish League 1 Gold star represents ten or more titles.
Legia Warsaw  Poland Polish League 1 Gold star represents ten or more titles.
Lech Poznań  Poland Polish League 1 Silver star represents five to nine titles.
ŁKS Łódź  Poland Polish League 1 White star represents one to four titles.
Piast Gliwice  Poland Polish League 1 White star represents one to four titles; first title won in 2019.
Polonia Bytom  Poland Polish League 1 White star represents one to four titles.
Śląsk Wrocław  Poland Polish League 1 White star represents one to four titles.
Warta Poznań  Poland Polish League 1 White star represents one to four titles.
Widzew Łódź  Poland Polish League 1 White star represents one to four titles.
Zagłębie Lubin  Poland Polish League 1 White star represents one to four titles.
Benfica  Portugal Portuguese League 3 Each star represents ten titles; announced in February 2008 for the following season,[76] by which time a 31st title had been won.
Steaua Bucureşti  Romania Romanian League 2 Each star represents ten titles.
Dinamo Bucureşti  Romania Romanian League 1 Represents ten titles.
CSKA Moscow  Russia Russian Premier League, Soviet Top League 2 Each star represents five titles.
Dynamo Moscow  Russia Soviet Top League 2 Each star represents five titles.
Spartak Moscow  Russia Russian Premier League, Soviet Top League 4 Each star represents five titles. Wore one star from 2003 to 2012 to commemorate their Russian Premier League wins, added another three in 2013 as Russian clubs were then allowed to include their pre-1992 Soviet titles in the tally.
Zenit Saint Petersburg  Russia Russian Premier League, Soviet Top League 1 Each star represents five titles.
Rangers  Scotland Scottish Premier League 5 Each star represents ten titles. World record 55 in total.
Aberdeen  Scotland European Cup Winners Cup and European Super Cup 2 Both trophies won in 1983. Aberdeen remain the only football club in Europe to incorporate a star for the European Super Cup.[23]
Celtic  Scotland European Cup 1 Star for European Cup win in 1967.[23][77][78]
Slovan Bratislava  Slovakia Fortuna Liga 3 Awarded in 2009, each star represents five titles.
MŠK Žilina  Slovakia Fortuna Liga 1 Awarded in 2010, the star represents five titles.
Maribor  Slovenia Slovenian PrvaLiga 1 Star represents ten titles.
Partizan  Serbia Serbian SuperLiga, First League of Serbia and Montenegro, Yugoslav First League 2 Each star represents ten titles.
Red Star Belgrade  Serbia Serbian SuperLiga, First League of Serbia and Montenegro, Yugoslav First League 3 Each star represents ten titles.
AIK  Sweden Svenska Mästerskapet, Allsvenskan, Mästerskapsserien 1 Each star represents ten Swedish championships.
Djurgårdens IF  Sweden Svenska Mästerskapet, Allsvenskan 1 Each star represents ten Swedish championships.
IFK Göteborg  Sweden Svenska Mästerskapet, Allsvenskan, Allsvenskan play-offs, Mästerskapsserien 1 Each star represents ten Swedish championships.
IFK Norrköping  Sweden Allsvenskan, Allsvenskan play-offs 1 Each star represents ten Swedish championships.
Malmö FF  Sweden Allsvenskan 2 Each star represents ten Swedish championships.
Örgryte IS  Sweden Svenska Mästerskapet, Allsvenskan play-offs 1 Each star represents ten Swedish championships.
Grasshoppers   Switzerland Swiss Super League 2 Each represents ten titles.[79]
Basel   Switzerland Swiss Super League 2 Each star represents ten titles.
Servette   Switzerland Swiss Super League 1 Represents ten titles.
Young Boys   Switzerland Swiss Super League 1 Represents ten titles.
Zürich   Switzerland Swiss Super League 1 Represents ten titles.
Galatasaray  Turkey Turkish Super League 4 Each star represents five titles.
Fenerbahçe  Turkey Turkish Super League 3 Each star represents five titles.
Beşiktaş  Turkey Turkish Super League 3 Each star represents five titles.
Trabzonspor  Turkey Turkish Super League 1 Represents five titles.
Dynamo Kyiv  Ukraine Ukrainian Premier League, Soviet Top League 2 Represents ten Ukrainian titles and ten USSR titles. Second star was added on 6 September 2007 for USSR champion titles.

Stars not signifying particular titles[edit]

American club Philadelphia Union has 13 stars that represent the 13 original colonies of the United States.[80] Fellow Major League Soccer franchise Montreal Impact had four stars on their badge, which were symbolic of the nationalities of the peoples who founded the city of Montreal, prior to rebranding as CF Montreal.[16] The four nations are regularly used in Montreal imagery, as the city flag and coat of arms both reference them. Minnesota United FC, who also play in Major League Soccer feature a star on their crest representing L'Etoile du Nord, the official motto of the state of Minnesota and the source of the state nickname, The North Star State.

The badge of Peñarol of Uruguay has 11 stars for the 11 players.[81]

The badge introduced by Manchester City in 1997 had three stars to give it a "more continental feel".[82] The 3 stars do not represent titles or trophies. City brought in a new club badge in 2016 with no stars on it.[83] Sivasspor of Turkey also has three stars on their badge. They do not represent any championships either.

Portsmouth F.C. has featured a star (of various designs) in its badge since 1913. The star does not represent trophies or titles won, instead, the Portsmouth badge was based upon symbols found in the official coat of arms owned by Portsmouth City Council.

For the 2002–03 season, the badge of Greek club Panathinaikos F.C. had 3 stars. One gold representing the team's partaking in the 1971 European Cup Final, and 2 white stars representing the team's participation at the 1985 European Cup semi-finals and the 1996 UEFA Champions League semi-finals respectively. Because none of these stars represent titles or trophies, opposition fans in Greece mocked this.

Johor Darul Takzim F.C. has 3 stars above its badge, for each time the club changed its name; from PKENJ to Johor and finally Johor Darul Takzim.[citation needed]

Following the crash of LaMia Flight 2933, Brazilian club Chapecoense incorporated a star into its badge as a tribute to those who perished in the incident.[62]

Yeovil Town F.C. added three stars above its crest for 2017–18, for every five seasons they have remained in the English Football League.[84]

Forest Green Rovers F.C. added three stars to the back of the neck area for 2018–19, to denote progression in the EFL. One star is coloured for promotion to League Two and the other two are faded until they reach the Championship.[85]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Seattle Sounders that played from 1994 to 2008 wore four stars, while the former Montreal Impact team wore three stars at the time of their move.
  2. ^ Although the Earthquakes moved and became the Houston Dynamo, that team forfeited the history of the Earthquakes and became an effective expansion team, with the new Earthquakes rejoining in 2008 with the original team's identity and permission to use two sanctioned stars, similarly to the relationship between the Cleveland Browns and Baltimore Ravens in American football.
  3. ^ Criciúma EC has a total of four national titles, more than any other in Santa Catarina state; however, the Campeonato Brasileiro Série B of 1986 is not recognized by Confederação Brasileira de Futebol, leaving them with just three stars.

References[edit]

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