Semantic Scholar

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Semantic Scholar
Semantic Scholar logo.png
Type of site
Search engine
Created byAllen Institute for Artificial Intelligence
URLsemanticscholar.org
LaunchedNovember 2015 (2015-11)

Semantic Scholar is an artificial-intelligence backed search engine for academic publications that was developed at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence and publicly released in November 2015.[1] The project uses a combination of machine learning, natural language processing, and machine vision to add a layer of semantic analysis to the traditional methods of citation analysis, and to extract relevant figures, entities, and venues from papers.[2] In comparison to Google Scholar and PubMed, Semantic Scholar is designed to highlight the most important and influential papers, and to identify the connections between them.

As of January 2018, following a 2017 project that added biomedical papers and topic summaries, the Semantic Scholar corpus included more than 40 million papers from computer science and biomedicine.[3] In March 2018, Doug Raymond, who developed machine learning initiatives for the Amazon Alexa platform, was hired to lead the Semantic Scholar project.[4]

As of August 2019, the number of included papers had grown to more than 173 million[5] after the addition of the Microsoft Academic Graph records.[6] Each paper hosted by Semantic Scholar is assigned a unique identifier called the Semantic Scholar Corpus ID (or S2CID for short), for example

Liu, Ying; Gayle, Albert A; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Rocklöv, Joacim (March 2020). "The reproductive number of COVID-19 is higher compared to SARS coronavirus". Journal of Travel Medicine. 27 (2). doi:10.1093/jtm/taaa021. PMC 7074654. PMID 32052846. S2CID 211099356.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Ariana Eunjung Cha (3 November 2015). "Paul Allen's AI research group unveils program that aims to shake up how we search scientific knowledge. Give it a try". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 6 November 2019. Retrieved November 3, 2015.
  2. ^ Bohannon, John (11 November 2016). "A computer program just ranked the most influential brain scientists of the modern era". Science. doi:10.1126/science.aal0371. Archived from the original on 29 April 2020. Retrieved 12 November 2016.
  3. ^ "AI2 scales up Semantic Scholar search engine to encompass biomedical research". GeekWire. 2017-10-17. Archived from the original on 2018-01-19. Retrieved 2018-01-18.
  4. ^ "Tech Moves: Allen Instititue Hires Amazon Alexa Machine Learning Leader; Microsoft Chairman Takes on New Investor Role; and More". GeekWire. 2018-05-02. Archived from the original on 2018-05-10. Retrieved 2018-05-09.
  5. ^ "main page". Semantic Scholar. Archived from the original on 11 August 2019. Retrieved 11 August 2019.
  6. ^ "AI2 joins forces with Microsoft Research to upgrade search tools for scientific studies". GeekWire. 2018-12-05. Archived from the original on 2019-08-25. Retrieved 2019-08-25.

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