Mardin Province

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Mardin Province

Mardin ili
Location of Mardin Province in Turkey
Location of Mardin Province in Turkey
CountryTurkey
RegionSoutheast Anatolia
SubregionMardin
Government
 • Electoral districtMardin
 • GovernorMustafa Yaman
 • Metropolitan MayorAhmet Turk (HDP)
Area
 • Total8,891 km2 (3,433 sq mi)
Population
 (2018)[1]
 • Total829,195
 • Density93/km2 (240/sq mi)
Area code(s)0482
Vehicle registration47

Mardin Province (Classical Syriac: ܡܪܕܐ‎, Turkish: Mardin ili, Kurdish: Parêzgeha Mêrdînê‎, Arabic: ماردين,), is a province of Turkey with a population of 809,719 in 2017. The population was 835,173 in 2000. The capital of the Mardin Province is Mardin (Classical Syriac: ܡܶܪܕܺܝܢ‎ "Mardin" Arabic: ماردين, Mardīn). Located near the traditional boundary of Anatolia and Mesopotamia, it has a diverse population, composed of Kurdish, Arab and Assyrian people, with Kurds forming the majority of the province's population.[2]

History[edit]

Mardin comes from the Syriac word (ܡܪܕܐ) and means "fortresses".[3][4]

The first known civilization were the Subarian-Hurrians who were then succeeded in 3000 BCE by the Hurrians. The Elamites gained control around 2230 BCE and were followed by the Babylonians, Hittites, Assyrians, Romans and Byzantines.[5]

The local Assyrians/Syriacs, while very reduced due to the massacres of the Assyrian Genocide and conflicts between the Kurds and Turks, hold on to two of the oldest monasteries in the world, Dayro d-Mor Hananyo (Turkish Deyrülzafaran, English Saffron Monastery) and Deyrulumur Monastery. The Christian community is concentrated on the Tur Abdin plateau and in the town of Midyat, with a smaller community (approximately 200) in the provincial capital.

Districts[edit]

Mardin districts

Mardin province is divided into 10 districts (capital district in bold):

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Population of provinces by years - 2000-2018". Turkish Statistical Institute. Retrieved 9 March 2019.
  2. ^ Watts, Nicole F. (2010). Activists in Office: Kurdish Politics and Protest in Turkey (Studies in Modernity and National Identity). Seattle: University of Washington Press. p. 167. ISBN 978-0-295-99050-7.
  3. ^ Lipiński, Edward (2000). The Aramaeans: Their Ancient History, Culture, Religion. Peeters Publishers. p. 146. ISBN 978-90-429-0859-8.
  4. ^ Payne Smith's A Compendious Syriac Dictionary, Dukhrana.com
  5. ^ "- Antik Tatlıdede Konağı - Mardin". www.tatlidede.com.tr. Retrieved 19 March 2018.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 37°21′47″N 40°54′31″E / 37.36306°N 40.90861°E / 37.36306; 40.90861



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