Derby della Madonnina

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Derby della Madonnina
IntervsMilan.png
Other namesMilan Derby, Derby di Milano
LocaleMilan, Italy
Teams
First meetingMilan 3–2 Internazionale
Italian Football Championship
(10 January 1909)
Latest meetingMilan 0–3 Internazionale
Serie A
(21 February 2021)
StadiumsSan Siro
Statistics
Meetings totalOfficial matches: 228
Unofficial matches: 71
Total matches: 299
Most winsOfficial matches: Internazionale (84)
Unofficial matches: Milan (36)
Total matches: Milan (113)
Top scorerAndriy Shevchenko (14)
Largest victoryInternazionale 0–6 Milan
Serie A
(11 May 2001)

The Derby della Madonnina, also known as the Derby di Milano (Milan Derby, in English), is a derby football match between the two prominent Milanese clubs, Internazionale and A.C. Milan. It is called Derby della Madonnina in honour of one of the main sights in the city of Milan, the statue of the Virgin Mary on the top of the Duomo, which is often referred to as the Madonnina ("Little Madonna" in Italian).

In the past, Internazionale (commonly abbreviated to Inter) was seen as the club of the Milan bourgeoisie (nicknamed bauscia, a Milanese term meaning "braggart"), whereas Milan (nicknamed casciavid, meaning "screwdriver" in Lombard language, with reference to the blue-collar worker) was supported mainly by working class.[1] Because of their more prosperous ancestry, Inter fans had the "luxury" to go to the San Siro stadium by motorcycle (motoretta, another nickname given to the Nerazzurri). On the other hand, the Rossoneri were also known as tramvee (i.e. able to be transferred to the stadium only by public transport). Today, this difference has largely been mitigated.

Taking place at least twice during the year via the league fixtures, this cross-town rivalry has extended to the Coppa Italia, Champions League, and Supercoppa Italiana, as well as minor tournaments and friendlies. It is one of the only major crosstown derbies in association football that are always played in the same stadium, in this case the San Siro, as both Milan and Internazionale call San Siro "home".

History[edit]

Scene of a Derby della Madonnina in 1915

On 13 December 1899, Alfred Edwards and others founded the Milan Cricket and Football Club. Edwards, a former British vice-consul in Milan and a well-known personality of the Milanese high society, was the club's first elected president. Initially, the team included a cricket section, managed by Edward Berra, and a football section managed by David Allison. The Milan team soon gained relevant notability under Herbert Kilpin's guide. The first trophy to be won was the Medaglia del Re ("King's Medal") in January 1900, and the team later won three national leagues, in 1901, 1906 and 1907. The triumph of 1901 was particularly relevant because it ended the consecutive series of wins of Genoa, which had been the only team to have won the title prior to 1901. On 9 March 1908, issues over the signing of foreign players led to a split and the foundation of Football Club Internazionale.

The first derby match between the two Milanese rivals was held in the final of the Chiasso Cup of 1908, a football tournament played in Canton Ticino, Switzerland, on 18 October of that year; the Rossoneri won 2–1. While Inter and Milan faced each other sporadically in the early years, the rivalry has been renewed annually since the inaugural 1926–27 season of the Divisione Nazionale, the first truly national Italian league. The two teams have played each other at least twice a year since then.

Gunnar Nordahl scoring a goal in a Milan derby on 25 March 1951

In the 1960s, the Milan derby saw two big stars of Italian football come face-to-face. One of the most representative players of Inter was Sandro Mazzola, the son of former Torino player Valentino Mazzola who, along with most of his Torino teammates, died in the 1949 Superga air disaster after dominating Serie A for four seasons. His Milan counterpart was Gianni Rivera, nicknamed "Golden Boy" for his talent. This era saw brilliant derby matches and an increasing rivalry: while Milan won the European Cup in 1962–63, Inter followed with back-to-back success in the following years. Milan again won the title in 1968–69. During this successful period for both teams, Milan were coached by Nereo Rocco and Inter by Helenio Herrera, both coaching many notable players. The rivalry continued on the Italian national team, where two players from their respective clubs would often not play together, with one usually being substituted by the other at half-time. Rivera ended up losing the starting line-up to Mazzola in the 1970 final against Brazil, in which Italy was defeated 1–4 by the South Americans. He would later enter in the 84th minute after Italy were already far behind.

Brothers Giuseppe (left) and Franco (right) Baresi face each other in the 1979–80 Milan derby

Arguably Milan's greatest-ever era took place during the late 1980s and had extended through to the mid-2000s. Often hailed as the greatest-ever Milan side, the team stemming from the 1989 European champions managed by Arrigo Sacchi, contained legendary Milan players, Marco van Basten, Ruud Gullit, Frank Rijkaard and Paolo Maldini, amongst others. Milan's dominance, both domestically and internationally, had seen them capture four league titles and three European Cups (finishing runners-up two additional times) between 1989 and 1996. During this time, Inter had gone on to finish runners-up in the 1992–93 season (behind Milan) and won two UEFA Cups.

Adriano heading a goal in a Milan derby on 15 February 2009

Inter's long wait for a league title that began after 1989 finally arrived in 2006, when the Calciopoli scandal stripped Juventus of the 2005–06 title (as well as deducting points from Milan's final overall total) and handed it to Inter, who originally finished third behind both Juventus and Milan. This was seen as a controversial decision by many, as even though the title won the previous season by Juventus was also stripped, it was left unawarded, which many felt should have also been the case with the 2005–06 title. Inter went on to win the 2006–07 Serie A title as well in a season that saw Juventus relegated from the top division, and Milan, as punishment, starting the season with negative points. Inter's triumphant campaign included a record-breaking run of 17 consecutive victories and victories in both fixtures against Milan. During the same season, however, Milan had captured their seventh European Cup/UEFA Champions League, defeating Liverpool in the Final in Athens. As the Italian league recovered from the aftermath of the match-fixing scandal, Inter continued to dominate, winning each league up until the 2009–10 season in which they secured the title on the last day of the season. That season had also seen Inter become the first Italian side to win a treble. In addition to their league title, Inter also secured the Coppa Italia and their first Champions League title since 1965. The following season, however, Milan, with the acquisition of several players that included former Inter striker Zlatan Ibrahimović, recaptured the Scudetto, their 18th overall, leading the league standings from as early as November until the end of the season. That season also saw Milan win both derby matches, keeping clean sheets in both fixtures.

Since 2011–12, both Milan teams have lagged behind Juventus in Serie A, with a disappointing ninth-place finish for Inter in 2012–13 and a difficult campaign for Milan in 2014–15, finishing tenth. Despite this, Inter have been the better of the two in derby matches, with eleven wins (including one in the 2020–21 Coppa Italia), six draws and five losses (including one in the 2011 Supercoppa Italiana and one in the 2017–18 Coppa Italia). Inter would then win a nineteenth title in 2020–21, overtaking Milan's total.

Official match results[edit]

Key[edit]

Colors

  Milan win
  Draw
  Inter win

Competitions
  • SF = Semi-finals
  • QF = Quarter-finals
  • R16 = Round of 16
  • R32 = Round of 32
  • GS = Group stage
  • R1 = Round 1
  • R2 = Round 2

Results[edit]

1 The 2002–03 UEFA Champions League semi-final tie was won by Milan on away goals after a 1–1 draw on aggregate.[2]
2 The 2004–05 UEFA Champions League second leg quarter-final match was abandoned after 72 minutes; UEFA awarded a 3–0 win for Milan as Inter fans threw flares onto the pitch.[3][4][2]
3 The 2017–18 Coppa Italia quarter-final match was won by Milan 1–0 after extra time.

Statistics[edit]

As of 21 February 2021
Matches Inter wins Draws Milan wins Inter goals Milan goals
First championships (1898–1929, 1945–1946) 22 8 3 11 40 36
Serie A (1929–present) 174 67 55 52 246 223
Championship 196 75 58 63 286 259
Campionato Alta Italia 2 1 0 1 3 3
Coppa Italia 25 8 7 10 24 34
Supercoppa Italiana 1 0 0 1 1 2
UEFA Champions League 4 0 2 2 1 6
Official matches 228 84 67 77 315 304

Top goalscorers[edit]

Below is the list of players who have scored at least six goals in official meetings.

The Rossonero Andriy Shevchenko, the top scorer of the Milan derby (14), and Giuseppe Meazza, the highest scorer of the Nerazzurri (12)
Rank Player Team(s) (goals) Goals
1 Ukraine Andriy Shevchenko Milan 14
2 Italy Giuseppe Meazza Inter (12)
Milan (1)
13
3 Sweden Gunnar Nordahl Milan 11
Hungary István Nyers Inter
5 Sweden Zlatan Ibrahimović Inter (2)
Milan (8)
10
Italy Enrico Candiani Inter (7)
Milan (3)
7 Brazil Italy José Altafini Milan 7
Italy Alessandro Altobelli Inter
Italy Roberto Boninsegna Inter
Italy Benito Lorenzi Inter
Belgium Louis Van Hege Milan
11 Italy Aldo Boffi Milan 6
Italy Aldo Cevenini Milan (4)
Inter (2)
Argentina Italy Attilio Demaría Inter
Italy Sandro Mazzola Inter
Argentina Diego Milito Inter
Italy Pietro Serantoni Inter

Most appearances[edit]

Below is the list of players who have played at least thirty games in official meetings.

The Rossonero Paolo Maldini, the record appearance-maker of the Milan derby (56) and Javier Zanetti, the record appearance-maker of the Nerazzurri (47)
Rank Player Team(s) (apps) Apps
1 Italy Paolo Maldini Milan 56
2 Argentina Javier Zanetti Inter 47
3 Italy Giuseppe Bergomi Inter 44
4 Italy Alessandro Costacurta Milan 43
5 Italy Gianni Rivera Milan 42
6 Italy Giacinto Facchetti Inter 40
Italy Sandro Mazzola Inter
Italy Giuseppe Meazza Inter (37)
Milan (3)
9 Italy Franco Baresi Milan 39
10 Italy Mauro Tassotti Milan 35
11 Italy Tarcisio Burgnich Inter 34
12 Italy Giuseppe Baresi Inter Milan 33
Italy Mario Corso Inter
14 Italy Marco Sala Milan (31)
Inter (1)
32
15 Netherlands Clarence Seedorf Inter (7)
Milan (24)
31
Italy Luigi Perversi Milan

Records[edit]

  • Most goals in a single derby: 11, Internazionale 6–5 Milan (6 November 1949)
  • Largest derby margin of victory for Milan: 0–6 (11 May 2001)
  • Largest derby margin of victory for Internazionale: 0–5 (6 February 1910)
  • Most derby wins in a row: 6, Milan (from 5 February 1911 to 9 February 1919, and from 30 May 1946 to 11 April 1948)
  • Most consecutive derby draws: 4 (from 29 September 1935 to 7 February 1937)
  • Most consecutive derby matches without a win: 17, Milan (from 10 November 1929 to 7 February 1937)
  • Most goals in consecutive derbies for a player: 5, Romelu Lukaku (from 21 Septemper 2019 to 21 February 2021)
  • Fastest derby goal scored for Internazionale: Sandro Mazzola, after 13 seconds (24 February 1963)
  • Fastest derby goal scored for Milan: José Altafini, after 25 seconds (26 March 1961)
  • Most goals in a single derby for a Milan player: 4, José Altafini (27 March 1960)
  • Most goals in a single derby for an Internazionale player: 3, Giovanni Capra (6 February 1910), Amedeo Amadei (6 November 1949), István Nyers (1 November 1953), Diego Milito (6 May 2012) and Mauro Icardi (15 October 2017)
  • Most derbies played in a calendar year: 4 (1946, 1958, 1968, 1972, 1974, 1975, 1985, 1993, 1994, 1998, 2003 and 2005)
  • Youngest goalscorer in a derby: Edoardo Mariani (27 febbraio 1910, aged 16 years and 359 days)
  • Oldest goalscorer in a derby: Zlatan Ibrahimović (26 January 2021, aged 39 years and 115 days)

Head-to-head ranking in Serie A (1930–2021)[edit]

P. 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5
6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6
7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7
8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8
9 9 9 9 9 9
10 10 10 10 10 10 10
11 11 11 11 11
12 12 12 12
13 13
14 14
15 15
16
17
18
19
20

Total: Milan with 41 higher finishes, Inter with 47 higher finishes (as of the end of the 2020–21 season).

Notes:

  • Both teams qualified for the final round of 8 teams in 1946
  • Both teams finished with the same number of points in 1958 and in 1991, but Milan had better goal difference in both cases

Players who played for both clubs[edit]

Note: Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only. Player names in bold are still active for one of the two clubs.

Inter, then Milan[edit]

Ronaldo’s Inter Milan away jersey (left) and A.C. Milan away jersey (right) in the San Siro museum. He played for Inter from 1997 to 2002, and A.C. Milan from 2007 to 2008
Name Pos. Inter Milan
Tenure Apps Goals Tenure Apps Goals
Italy Giuseppe Meazza FW 1927–1940 348 241 1940–1942 37 9
1946–1947 17 2
Italy Enrico Candiani MF 1937–1946 187 71 1949–1950 22 8
Italy Aldo Bet DF 1967–1968 8 0 1974–1981 144 0
Italy Aldo Serena FW 1978–1981 2 1
1981–1983 21 2 1982–1983 20 8
1983–1985 28 8
1987–1991 114 45 1991-1993 10 0
Italy Maurizio Ganz FW 1995–1997 68 26 1998–2001 40 9
Nigeria Taribo West DF 1997–1999 44 1 2000–2001 4 1
Brazil Ronaldo FW 1997–2002 68 49 2007–2008 20 9
Italy Andrea Pirlo MF 1998–2001 22 0 2001–2011 284 32
Croatia Dario Šimić DF 1999–2002 66 3 2002–2008 82 1
Italy Christian Vieri FW 1999–2005 143 103 2005–2006 8 1
Netherlands Clarence Seedorf MF 2000–2002 64 8 2002–2012 300 47
Argentina Hernán Crespo FW 2002–2003 18 7 2004–2005 28 11
2006–2008 49 18
2008–2009 14 2
Italy Giuseppe Favalli DF 2004–2006 49 0 2006–2010 75 2
Sweden Zlatan Ibrahimović FW 2006–2009 88 57 2010–2012 61 42
2020– 37 25
Italy Mario Balotelli FW 2007–2010 59 20 2013–2014 43 26
2015–2016 20 1
Brazil Mancini FW 2008–2010 26 1 2010 7 0
Ghana Sulley Muntari MF 2008–2012 66 7 2012 13 3
2012–2015 57 8
Italy Giampaolo Pazzini FW 2011–2012 50 16 2012–2015 74 21
Italy Andrea Poli MF 2011–2012 18 0 2013–2017 90 3
Argentina Matías Silvestre DF 2012–2015 9 0 2013–2014 4 1
Italy Leonardo Bonucci DF 2005–2006 1 0
2006–2007 0 0 2017–2018 35 2

Milan, then Inter[edit]

Name Pos. Milan Inter
Tenure Apps Goals Tenure Apps Goals
Italy Aldo Cevenini FW 1909–1912 42 15 1912–1915 51 42
1915–1919 42 48 1919–1921 18 2
1922–1923 22 1
Italy Luigi Cevenini FW 1911–1912 1 1 1912–1915 55 63
1915–1919 7 5 1919–1921 40 54
1922–1927 94 42
Italy Lorenzo Buffon GK 1949–1959 277 0 1960–1963 79 0
Italy Fulvio Collovati DF 1976–1982 158 4 1982–1986 109 3
Italy Francesco Toldo GK 1990–1993 0 0 2001–2010 148 0
Italy Christian Panucci DF 1993–1996 89 9 1999–2001 26 1
Italy Cristian Brocchi MF 1994–1998 0 0 2000–2001 15 1
2001–2008 99 4
Italy Roberto Baggio FW 1995–1997 51 12 1998–2000 41 9
Italy Francesco Coco DF 1995–2002 56 2 2002–2007 26 0
Netherlands Edgar Davids MF 1996–1997 19 0 2004–2005 14 0
France Patrick Vieira MF 1995–1996 2 0 2006–2010 67 6
Argentina Guly MF 1998–2001 57 6 2001–2004 30 0
Denmark Thomas Helveg DF 1998–2003 105 0 2003–2004 23 0
Croatia Dražen Brnčić MF 2000–2001 1 0 2001–2003 0 0
Turkey Ümit Davala DF 2001–2002 10 0 2002–2004 0 0
Italy Antonio Cassano FW 2011–2012 33 7 2012–2013 28 7
Italy Matteo Darmian DF 2006–2010 4 0 2020– 26 3
Turkey Hakan Çalhanoğlu MF 2017–2021 135 22 2021– 0 0

Trophies[edit]

Team Major domestic International Grand total
SA CI SCI Total UCL UCWC UEL USC FCWC / IC Total
Milan 18 5 7 30 7 2 - 5 4 18 48
Inter 19 7 5 31 3 - 3 - 3 9 40

References[edit]

  1. ^ E. Pigozzi, Come difendersi dai Milanesi. Firenze, Giunti, 2006 (in Italian)
  2. ^ a b #TBT: 5 European clashes against Italian sides, A.C. Milan, 30 November 2017
  3. ^ "Milan move into last four". UEFA. 13 April 2005. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  4. ^ "Inter handed stadium ban and fine". BBC Sport. 15 April 2005. Retrieved 3 November 2017.

External links[edit]