Deoxycytidine

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Deoxycytidine
Skeletal formula of deoxycytidine
Ball-and-stick model of the deoxycytidine molecule
Names
Other names
2′-Deoxycytidine
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.012.231
MeSH Deoxycytidine
UNII
Properties
C9H13N3O4
Molar mass 227.217
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Deoxycytidine is a deoxyribonucleoside, a component of deoxyribonucleic acid. It is similar to the ribonucleoside cytidine, but with one hydroxyl group removed from the 2' position.

Can be phosphorylated at C-5 by Deoxycytidine kinase converting it to a thiamine nucleotide, a DNA precursor.[1]

It can also be used as a precursor for (5-aza-2′-Deoxycytidine) a treatment for MDS patients. This compound can slows the cell cycle by interfering with the methylation of the P15/INK4B gene, increasing the expression P15/INK4B protein. which subdues the transformation of MDS to leukemia.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Staub M, Eriksson S (2006). "The Role of Deoxycytidine Kinase in DNA Synthesis and Nucleoside Analog Activation". In Peters GJ (ed.). Deoxynucleoside Analogs In Cancer Therapy. Cancer Drug Discovery and Development. Humana Press. pp. 29–52. doi:10.1007/978-1-59745-148-2_2. ISBN 978-1-59745-148-2.
  2. ^ Kim KW, Roh JK, Wee HJ, Kim C (2016). "Molecular Targeted Anticancer Drugs". In Kim KW, Roh JK, Wee HJ, Kim C (eds.). Cancer Drug Discovery: Science and History. Springer Netherlands. pp. 175–238. doi:10.1007/978-94-024-0844-7_9. ISBN 978-94-024-0844-7.