Atarib market massacre

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Atarib market bombing
Atarib market massacre
Part of Russian intervention in Syria
Location of Atarib in Syria
LocationAtarib, Aleppo Governorate, Syria
Coordinates36°08′N 36°49′E / 36.133°N 36.817°E / 36.133; 36.817
Date13 November 2017; 24 months ago (2017-11-13)
~2:00 PM[1] (local time)
TargetFree Syrian police station
Attack type
Airstrike
WeaponsAerial bombs
Deaths84[2]
Injuries
150[2]
Perpetrators Russian Air Force[2]
Motiveunknown

The 2017 Atarib airstrike was an air strike by the Russian Air Force on the Free Syrian police station of the town of Atarib, Syria on 13 November 2017 that killed at least 84 people and injured 150.[3][1][2][1]

Events[edit]

Between 14:07 and 14:11, the Atarib market and police station were targeted by three air strikes resulting in the death of at least 84 people and injuring of 150.

UN investigation[edit]

On 6 March 2018, the United Nations Independent International Commission of Inquiry on the Syrian Arab Republic published a report on the attack, saying it was carried out by the Russian Air Force and may constitute a war crime.

According to the Commission's report, "early warning observers monitored the take-off of a fixed-wing aircraft, whose pilots communicated in Russian, from Hemeimeem airbase at 1:37 p.m. and tracked the aircraft going south and then to the northeast all the way to Atarib where it arrived at 2:07 p.m". The report said the attack "may account to a war crime of launching indiscriminate attacks resulting in death and injury to civilians."[2][4][5]

Human Rights Watch[edit]

"Under the laws of war, police and police stations are presumptuously civilian objects unless the police are taking a direct part in the hostilities", Human Rights Watch said.[1] Eyewitness reports claimed that the entire market, containing 100 shops, was destroyed in the explosions.[6] They damaged or destroyed an area of approximately 5,000 sq metres. Weapons used were the unguided OFAB-500 fragmentation bomb, and the BETAB-500 unguided bunker buster bomb.[7]

Two previous attacks had targeted the market on 25 July 2016 (8 dead) and 24 April 2014 (31 dead).

Named victims[edit]

As many of 69 of the dead have been named as follows: 1. Rashad Mohammed Abdrrahim, a civilian. 2. Ali Shereqi, a civilian. 3. Omar Ali Rasheed, a civilian. 4. Abdulqader Mohammed Eid al-Badawi, a civilian. 5. Mohammed Khalid Mesto, a civilian. 6. Hussein Mar’ei, a civilian. 7. Abdullah Abdrrahim, a civilian. 8. Omar Abdo Rasheed, a civilian. 9. Yousef as-Saleet, a civilian. 10. Ali Hallaq, a civilian. 11. As’ad Haj Taher, a civilian. 12. Mohammed Ammar Deebo, a civilian. 13. Hazim Khaled Deebo Ibrahim, a civilian. 14. Nasir Haj Mar’ei, a civilian. 15. Mohammed Nasir Hej Mar’ei, a civilian. 16. Mohammed Mahmoud Abian, a civilian. 17. The laboratory physician, Ahmad Omar Isa, a civilian. 18. Abdelazeem Ahmad Jaqoum, a civilian. 19. Aref Jbraeel, a civilian. 20. Yousef Bakrish, a civilian. 21. Hamoudeh Faisal Ibrahim, a civilian. 22. Deebo Abdulqader Deebo, a civilian. 23. Hasan Ibrahim Shweif, a civilian. 24. Ghassan Ayoub, a civilian. 25. Hussam Zreiq, a civilian. 26. Abderrazaq Ali al-Ameer, a civilian. 27. Mohammed Hussein Hijazi, a civilian. 28. Ali Faker Rasheed, a civilian. 29. Nasir Ahmad Hajer, a civilian. 30. Mohammed Sultan, a civilian. 31. Mostafa Ahmad Da’doush, a civilian. 32. Anas Hayed, a civilian. 33. Hasan Khalifa, a civilian. 34. Hussein Qasim, a civilian. 35. Khalloq Hallaq, a civilian. 36. Ahmad Hussein Jablawi, a civilian. 37. Mohammed Nour Hayed, a civilian. 38. Khalid Mearzaf, a civilian. 39. Ammar Hussam Barakat, a civilian. 40. Mostafa Hamdan, a civilian. 41. Redwan Ayoub Haj Hamada, a civilian. 42. Mohammed Munir Saleh, a civilian. 43. Mohammed Abdo Haj Mar’ei, a civilian. 44. Murshid al-Mahrouq, a civilian. 45. Naji Sheikh Ibrahim, a civilian. 46. Ahmad Othman, a civilian. 47. Ahmad Othman's wife, a woman. 48. Asma Riyad Khalil, a woman. 49. Zanoub Sheikh Abdel hay, a woman. 50. Hiba Othman, a woman from al-Leramon. 51. Rowaida Shawa, a woman. 52. Zahra Hussein Jablawi, a woman from Kefr Nouran town. 53. Moayad Abdo Waheeba, a child,. 54. The daughter of Mohammed Qayes Haj Mar’ei, a child. 55. Ayman Abdo Karbo Zarzor, a handicapped child with polio. 56. Ahmad Saied Ibrahim, a missing child. List of Police Officers Killed in Shelling the Free Police Station Located at the Entrance to the Main Market in Atarib 1. Mohammed Abderrazaq al-Faj, a police officer. 2. Yamen Saeed ash-Shon, a police officer. 3. Hamdo Saeed ash-Shon, a police officer. 4. Omar Mohammed Deeb Shahoud, a police officer. 5. Hussein Sha’alan Abderrazaq, a police officer. 6. Mostafa Mohammed Othman, a police officer. 7. Jbraeel AbdlWahid Jbraeel, a police officer. 8. Ibrahim Mohammed Ibrahim, a police officer. 9. Ahmad Abdo Taher, a police officer. 10. Hamdi Ways al-Ali, a police officer. 11. Mohammed Hamdo Hamdo, a police officer. 12. Fadl Mohammed Eid Abdurrahman, a police officer. 13. Basil Mohammed Shahid al-Hussein as-Sawadi.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Syria: In Talks, Focus on Protecting Civilians: Syrians Under Siege, Airstrikes as Leaders Gather in Sochi". Human Rights Watch. 22 November 2017. Retrieved 8 March 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Report of the Independent International Commission of Inquiry on the Syrian Arab Republic" (PDF). United Nations Human Rights Council. 1 February 2018. p. 17. Retrieved 8 March 2018.
  3. ^ https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/13/world/middleeast/airstrikes-kill-dozens-of-people-in-syrian-market.html%7Ctitle=Airstrikes Kill Dozens of People in Syrian Market|date=13 November 2017|via=NYTimes.com}}
  4. ^ Nick Cumming-Bruce (6 March 2018). "U.N. Panel Links Russia to Potential War Crime in Syria". New York Times. Retrieved 8 March 2018.
  5. ^ News, ABC. "International News: Latest Headlines, Video and Photographs from Around the World – People, Places, Crisis, Conflict, Culture, Change, Analysis and Trends". ABC News.
  6. ^ "Syria war: Air strikes on Atareb market 'kill more than 50'". BBC News. 13 November 2017. Retrieved 8 March 2018.
  7. ^ Kareem Shaheen (6 March 2018). "Russia suspected of using 'dumb' bombs to shift blame for Syria war crimes". Guardian. Retrieved 8 March 2018.
  8. ^ "Bombing Civilians at Public Market in Syria's Atarib – bellingcat". bellingcat.com. 22 December 2017.

External links[edit]



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