Arab Socialist Ba'ath Party – Lebanon Region

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Arab Socialist Ba'ath Party – Lebanon Region

حزب البعث العربي الاشتراكي في لبنان
LeaderDisputed
Founded1966 (1966)[citation needed]
HeadquartersBeirut[citation needed]
IdeologyBa'athism
National affiliationMarch 8 Alliance
International affiliationSyrian-led Ba'ath Party
ColorsBlack, Red, White and Green (Pan-Arab colors)
Parliament of Lebanon
1 / 128
Party flag
Flag of the Ba'ath Party.svg

The Arab Socialist Ba'ath Party – Lebanon Region, commonly known as the Arab Socialist Ba'ath Party in Lebanon (Arabic: حزب البعث العربي الاشتراكي في لبنانḤizb al-Ba‘th al-‘Arabī al-Ishtirākī fī Lubnān) and officially the Lebanon Regional Branch, is a political party in Lebanon. It is the regional branch of the Damascus-based Arab Socialist Ba'ath Party. The leadership has been disputed since 2015; however, Fayez Shukr was the party leader from 2006 to 2015, when he succeeded Sayf al-Din Ghazi who in turn succeeded Assem Qanso.

History[edit]

The Lebanese branch of the undivided Ba'ath Party had been formed in 1949–1950.[1] Assem Qanso is the longest-serving secretary (leader) of the Lebanese Ba'ath Party;[2] first from 1971 to 1989 and again from 2000 to 2005.[3] During the Lebanese Civil War, the party had an armed militia, the Assad Battalion.[4] The party joined forces with Kamal Jumblatt's Progressive Socialist Party in organizing the Lebanese National Movement, seeking to abolish the confessional state.[5] The Lebanese National Movement was later superseded by the Lebanese National Resistance Front, in which the party participated.[6] The party organized resistance against Israeli forces in Lebanon.[6] In July 1987 it took part in forming yet another front, the Unification and Liberation Front.[7]

In the 2009 parliamentary election, the party won two seats as part of the March 8 Alliance. The parliamentarians of the party are Assem Qanso and Qassem Hashem.[8]

The Lebanese Ba'ath Party is also militarily involved in the Syrian Civil War, and has sent forces under its control to aid Bashar al-Assad's government against the Syrian opposition. One contingent, allegedly 400 fighters strong, took part in the Daraa offensive (June 2017).[9] Its commander, Hussein Ali Rabiha from Nabatieh, was killed during this operation.[10]

Prior to the 2018 Lebanese general election, the Arab Socialist Baath Party had suffered a split, with Regional Secretary Assem Qanso and Numan Shalq heading in different directions.[11] Both factions had nominated candidates for the elections, but none was accepted into a list and were thus eliminated from the polls. Reportedly, the Syrian ambassador, Ali Abdul Karim, had lobbied against any list accepting Qanso's candidates, as his group is not recognized from Damascus. A Baathist politician, Kassem Hachem, was included in a list in South III as Amal candidate, but not on behalf of the party. Former Regional Secretary Fayez Shukr headed a list in Bekaa III.[12]

Party leaders[edit]

  • Mahmoud Baydoun (1966–1969)
  • Magali Nasrawin (1969–1971)
  • Assem Qanso (1971–1989)
  • Abdullah Al-Amin (1989–1993)
  • Abdallah Chahal (1993–1996)
  • Sayf al-Din Ghazi (1996–2000)
  • Assem Qanso (2000–2005)
  • Sayf al-Din Ghazi (2005–2006)
  • Fayez Shukr (2006–2015)
  • Disputed (2015–present)

Legislative Elections[edit]

House of Representatives
Election year # of
overall votes
% of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/– Leader
1992 ???? (#6) ???
2 / 128
Increase 2
Abdullah Al-Amin
1996 ???? (#5) ???
2 / 128
Steady
Abdallah Chahal
2000 ???? (#5) ???
3 / 128
Increase 1
Sayf al-Din Ghazi
2005 ???? (#7) ???
1 / 128
Decrease 2
Assem Qanso
2009 ???? (#7) ???
2 / 128
Increase 1
Fayez Shukr
2018 ???? (#?) ???
1 / 128
Decrease 1
Disputed

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Seddon, David (2004). A political and Economic Dictionary of the Middle East. Taylor & Francis. p. 85. ISBN 1-85743-212-6.
  2. ^ "The future of Syria's pawns in Lebanon". www.lebanonwire.com. Retrieved 23 December 2014.
  3. ^ The Soviet Union and the Middle East. 8. Indiana University. 1983. p. 20.
  4. ^ Federal Research Division (2004). Syria: A Country Study. Kessinger Publishing. p. 282. ISBN 978-1-4191-5022-7.
  5. ^ O'Ballance, Edgar (1998). Civil War in Lebanon, 1975–92. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 62. ISBN 0-312-21593-2.
  6. ^ a b O'Ballance, Edgar (1998). Civil War in Lebanon, 1975–92. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 149. ISBN 0-312-21593-2.
  7. ^ O'Ballance, Edgar (1998). Civil War in Lebanon, 1975–92. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 179. ISBN 0-312-21593-2.
  8. ^ "March14 – March 8 MPs". NOW Lebanon. 11 March 2009. Retrieved 24 October 2011.
  9. ^ "The Lebanese Baath Party Announces The Death Of Its Leader In Daraa". Wasioun News. 6 July 2017. Retrieved 14 August 2019.
  10. ^ "Militias of Lebanese Baath party Along with the Assad forces in the battles of Daraa". Needa. 15 June 2017. Retrieved 14 August 2019.
  11. ^ قرارات طرد ستطال قياديين بعثيين. khiyam.com (in Arabic). 8 January 2017.
  12. ^ خاص - حزب البعث خارج السباق الإنتخابي .. فما علاقة الحلفاء؟. alkalimaonline.com (in Arabic). 7 April 2018.