2016 Quetta police training college attack

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Quetta police training college attack
LocationBalochistan Police College, Quetta, Balochistan, Pakistan
Date24 October 2016
TargetPolice training centre
Attack type
Mass shooting, suicide bombing, hostage-taking
Deaths62
Injured165+
PerpetratorsIslamic State of Iraq and the Levant – Khorasan Province
Lashkar-e-Jhangvi
No. of participants
3

On 24 October 2016, three heavily armed terrorists carried out an attack on the Balochistan police training college in Quetta, Pakistan, killing 61 cadets and injuring more than 165 others.[1][2][3] The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant – Khorasan Province claimed responsibility for the attack,[4] and Pakistan-based Lashkar-e-Jhangvi claimed to have collaborated with them.[5] According to Pakistani authorities, the assailants came from Afghanistan and were in contact with their handlers there while perpetrating the attack.[6]

Attack[edit]

Three militants entered the training centre around 11:10 pm on Tuesday 24 October,[2][7] while cadets were sleeping, and opened fire before taking hundreds of police cadets hostage and engaging in a standoff with security forces. At least 61 people were killed and over 165 people were injured as well.[4][8][9][10]

Three militants were killed during the attack. Two detonated suicide belts and the third was shot by police, with many of the victims being killed when the attackers detonated their belts.[10]

Perpetrators[edit]

Pakistan's national security advisor Naseer Khan Janjua stated to U.S. ambassador David Hale that India's Research and Analysis Wing and Afghanistan's National Directorate of Security (NDS) were "patronising" terrorist organisations on attacking soft targets in Pakistan, and emphasised the need for effective action against militant elements in Afghanistan linked to the attack.[11][12]

Maj. Gen. Sher Afgan, the chief of the Frontier Corps in Quetta, said that a faction of Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, a Pakistan-based sectarian Sunni group, was believed to have carried out the attack. Shortly afterwards, Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant – Khorasan Province (ISIL) claimed responsibility via its Amaq media wing. It also released the photos of the claimed attackers.[13][14][15] [16]

A senior security official said that the ISIL had "outsourced" the attack to Lashkar-e-Jhangvi.[14] A spokesman of the Lashkar-e-Jhangvi faction Al-Alami subsequently told Reuters that the two groups (Al-Alami and ISIL) had "done this attack together".[5] Analysts said that the ISIL clearly has a presence in Pakistan and has local groups working with it.[15]

Aftermath[edit]

Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif cancelled all of his engagements and called a meeting with arms officials in Quetta.[17][18] Pakistan's national security advisor Naseer Khan Janjua stated to U.S. ambassador David Hale that India's Research and Analysis Wing and Afghanistan's National Directorate of Security (NDS) were "patronising" terrorist organisations on attacking soft targets in Pakistan, and emphasised the need for effective action against militant elements in Afghanistan linked to the attack.[11][12]

Chief Minister Sanaullah Zehri revealed on 10 November 2016 the arrest of mastermind and facilitator of the attack.[19]

Reactions[edit]

International[edit]

The Chinese Foreign Ministry,[20] French Foreign Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault,[21][22] Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affair,[23][24] German Minister of Foreign Affairs Frank-Walter Steinmeier,[25] Indian Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar,[26][27] Russia President Vladimir Putin,[28] British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson,[29] United States State Department Spokesperson John Kirby all condemned the attack and expressed their solidarity with Pakistan.[30]

The United Nations[31][32] and the European Union condemned the terrorist attack, and pledged to "work closely together with Pakistan to fight the global threat of terrorism and expressed condolences to the families of the victims."[33]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shah, Syed Ali; Sherani, Hafeezullah (24 October 2016). "60 killed in twin suicide attacks as terrorists storm police training college in Quetta". Dawn. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  2. ^ a b "61 killed, at least 165 injured as militants storm police training centre in Quetta". The Express Tribune. 24 October 2016. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  3. ^ "At Least 61 Die as Militants Storm Police College Near Quetta, Pakistan". The New York Times. 25 October 2016. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  4. ^ a b "Quetta attack survivor: 'We were sleeping when terrorists attacked'". CNN. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  5. ^ a b LeJ 'collaborated with ISIS' for Quetta attack, The Nation, 26 October 2016.
  6. ^ "Assailants came from Afghanistan, PM told". Dawn. 26 October 2016. Retrieved 26 October 2016.
  7. ^ "At least 60 killed, over 100 injured in Pak police academy attack". The Times of India. 25 October 2016. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  8. ^ "Quetta attack death toll rises to 61, over 165 injured". samaa.tv. Samaa Web Desk. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  9. ^ "50 killed, dozens injured in attack on Pakistani police training center – reports". Russia: RT. Retrieved 24 October 2016.
  10. ^ a b "Quetta police college attack leaves dozens dead". BBC News. Retrieved 24 October 2016.
  11. ^ a b "RAW, NDS patronising terror groups in Afghanistan". The Nation. 26 October 2016. Retrieved 26 October 2016.
  12. ^ a b "RAW, NDS patronising terror groups in Afghanistan, national security adviser tells US envoy". Dawn. 26 October 2016. Retrieved 26 October 2016.
  13. ^ Quetta attack survivor: 'We were sleeping when terrorists attacked', CNN, 25 October 2016.
  14. ^ a b Salman Masood, Pakistan Reels After Attack on Police Training College Leaves 61 Dead, The New York Times, 25 October 2016.
  15. ^ a b "Islamic State claims attack on Pakistan police academy, 59 dead". Reuters. 25 October 2016. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  16. ^ Kunwar Khuldune Shahid, Quetta Police College Attack: Pakistan Is Increasingly Vulnerable to Terrorism, The Diplomat, 25 October 2016.
  17. ^ "PM postpones all engagements after Quetta police academy attack". Dunya News. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  18. ^ "PPM Nawaz to chair security meeting in Quetta". The News International. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  19. ^ "CM Balochistan announces arrest of mastermind".
  20. ^ "China condemns terrorist attack in Quetta". The News International. 25 October 2016. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  21. ^ "France condemns attack on Quetta police training centre". Daily Pakistan. 25 October 2016. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  22. ^ "France condemns attack on Quetta". Business Recorder. 25 October 2016. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  23. ^ "Japan condemn the terrorist attacks in Quetta". The News International. 25 October 2016. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  24. ^ "Japan condemns Quetta terrorist attack". Associated Press of Pakistan. 25 October 2016. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  25. ^ "Attack on Police Academy in Pakistan". Sputnik news. 25 October 2016. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  26. ^ "Indian defence minister denounces Quetta terror attack". 25 October 2016. Retrieved 26 October 2016.
  27. ^ "Indian defence minister reacts to Quetta attack". Geo News. 25 October 2016. Retrieved 26 October 2016.
  28. ^ "Putin Confident Masterminds of Quetta Terrorist Attack to Be Brought to Justice". Sputnik news. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  29. ^ "UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson on Tuesday condemned the deadly attack on a police academy in the northern Pakistani city of Quetta". Sputnik news. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  30. ^ "US condemns terrorist attack in Quetta". Dunya News. 25 October 2016. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  31. ^ Ali Sindhu, Haider (26 October 2016). "UN chief condemns attack on Quetta police academy". Daily Pakistan. Retrieved 26 October 2016.
  32. ^ "Statement attributable spokesperson secretary general attack police". United Nations. 26 October 2016. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  33. ^ "High Representative of EU Condemns Quetta Terrorist Attack".

Further reading[edit]

Coordinates: 30°21′36″N 67°01′12″E / 30.3600°N 67.0200°E / 30.3600; 67.0200



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